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Smoking cessation advice for patients with chronic periodontitis.
Br Dent J. 2006 Mar 11; 200(5):272-5; discussion 265.BD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There are limited data on the utility of dental professionals in providing smoking cessation counselling in the UK.

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this study was to determine quit rates for smokers with chronic periodontitis who were referred to a dental hospital for treatment.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Forty-nine subjects with chronic periodontitis who smoked cigarettes were recruited. All subjects received periodontal treatment and smoking cessation advice as part of an individual, patient-based programme provided by dental hygienists trained in smoking cessation counselling. Smoking cessation interventions included counselling (all patients), and some patients also received nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and/or Zyban medication. Smoking cessation advice was given at each visit at which periodontal treatment was undertaken (typically four to six visits) over a period of 10-12 weeks. Smoking cessation advice was also given monthly during the programme of supportive periodontal care over the following nine months. Smoking status was recorded at three, six and 12 months and was confirmed with carbon monoxide (CO) monitors and salivary cotinine assays.

RESULTS

Forty-one per cent, 33%, 29% and 25% of patients had stopped smoking at week four, months three, six and 12, respectively. Gender, age, the presence of another smoker in the household, and baseline smoking status (determined using subject-reported pack years of smoking) were not significant predictors of quit success (P < 0.05). Baseline CO levels were significantly associated with quit success, however, and were significantly higher in those subjects who continued to smoke compared to those subjects who were quitters at week four, month three and month six (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Success rates in quitting smoking following smoking cessation advice given as part of a periodontal treatment compared very favourably to national quit rates achieved in specialist smoking cessation clinics. The dental profession has a crucial role to play in smoking cessation counselling, particularly for patients with chronic periodontitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dental Sciences, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. hani.nasry@nuth.northy.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16528334

Citation

Nasry, H A., et al. "Smoking Cessation Advice for Patients With Chronic Periodontitis." British Dental Journal, vol. 200, no. 5, 2006, pp. 272-5; discussion 265.
Nasry HA, Preshaw PM, Stacey F, et al. Smoking cessation advice for patients with chronic periodontitis. Br Dent J. 2006;200(5):272-5; discussion 265.
Nasry, H. A., Preshaw, P. M., Stacey, F., Heasman, L., Swan, M., & Heasman, P. A. (2006). Smoking cessation advice for patients with chronic periodontitis. British Dental Journal, 200(5), 272-5; discussion 265.
Nasry HA, et al. Smoking Cessation Advice for Patients With Chronic Periodontitis. Br Dent J. 2006 Mar 11;200(5):272-5; discussion 265. PubMed PMID: 16528334.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking cessation advice for patients with chronic periodontitis. AU - Nasry,H A, AU - Preshaw,P M, AU - Stacey,F, AU - Heasman,L, AU - Swan,M, AU - Heasman,P A, PY - 2005/04/14/accepted PY - 2006/3/11/pubmed PY - 2006/5/5/medline PY - 2006/3/11/entrez SP - 272-5; discussion 265 JF - British dental journal JO - Br Dent J VL - 200 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the utility of dental professionals in providing smoking cessation counselling in the UK. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine quit rates for smokers with chronic periodontitis who were referred to a dental hospital for treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine subjects with chronic periodontitis who smoked cigarettes were recruited. All subjects received periodontal treatment and smoking cessation advice as part of an individual, patient-based programme provided by dental hygienists trained in smoking cessation counselling. Smoking cessation interventions included counselling (all patients), and some patients also received nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and/or Zyban medication. Smoking cessation advice was given at each visit at which periodontal treatment was undertaken (typically four to six visits) over a period of 10-12 weeks. Smoking cessation advice was also given monthly during the programme of supportive periodontal care over the following nine months. Smoking status was recorded at three, six and 12 months and was confirmed with carbon monoxide (CO) monitors and salivary cotinine assays. RESULTS: Forty-one per cent, 33%, 29% and 25% of patients had stopped smoking at week four, months three, six and 12, respectively. Gender, age, the presence of another smoker in the household, and baseline smoking status (determined using subject-reported pack years of smoking) were not significant predictors of quit success (P < 0.05). Baseline CO levels were significantly associated with quit success, however, and were significantly higher in those subjects who continued to smoke compared to those subjects who were quitters at week four, month three and month six (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Success rates in quitting smoking following smoking cessation advice given as part of a periodontal treatment compared very favourably to national quit rates achieved in specialist smoking cessation clinics. The dental profession has a crucial role to play in smoking cessation counselling, particularly for patients with chronic periodontitis. SN - 0007-0610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16528334/Smoking_cessation_advice_for_patients_with_chronic_periodontitis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.4813307 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -