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Uptake of zinc, cadmium and phosphorus by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) from a low available phosphorus calcareous soil spiked with zinc and cadmium.
Environ Geochem Health. 2006 Feb-Apr; 28(1-2):111-9.EG

Abstract

In a multifactorial pot experiment, maize (Zea mays L.) with or without inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae BEG167 was grown in a sterilized soil spiked with three levels of zinc (0, 300 and 900 mg Zn kg(-1) soil) and three levels of cadmium (0, 25 and 100 mg Cd kg(-1) soil). At harvest after 8 weeks of growth, the proportion of root length of inoculated plants colonized decreased with increasing Zn or Cd addition, and was 56% in the absence of both metals and was reduced significantly to 27% in the presence of the higher levels of both metals. Mycorrhizal plants had higher biomass than non-mycorrhizal controls except at the highest soil level of Cd. Cadmium had more pronounced effects on plant biomass than did Zn at the levels studied and the two metals showed a significant interaction. The data suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation increased plant growth with enhancement of P nutrition, perhaps increasing plant tolerance to Zn and Cd by a dilution effect. AM inoculation also led to higher soil solution pH after harvest, possibly reducing the availability of the metals for plant uptake, and lowered the concentrations of soluble Zn and Cd in the soil solution, perhaps by adsorption onto the extrametrical mycelium.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Nutrition, China Agricultural University, Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, 100094 Beijing, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16528586

Citation

Shen, Hong, et al. "Uptake of Zinc, Cadmium and Phosphorus By Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Maize (Zea Mays L.) From a Low Available Phosphorus Calcareous Soil Spiked With Zinc and Cadmium." Environmental Geochemistry and Health, vol. 28, no. 1-2, 2006, pp. 111-9.
Shen H, Christie P, Li X. Uptake of zinc, cadmium and phosphorus by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) from a low available phosphorus calcareous soil spiked with zinc and cadmium. Environ Geochem Health. 2006;28(1-2):111-9.
Shen, H., Christie, P., & Li, X. (2006). Uptake of zinc, cadmium and phosphorus by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) from a low available phosphorus calcareous soil spiked with zinc and cadmium. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 28(1-2), 111-9.
Shen H, Christie P, Li X. Uptake of Zinc, Cadmium and Phosphorus By Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Maize (Zea Mays L.) From a Low Available Phosphorus Calcareous Soil Spiked With Zinc and Cadmium. Environ Geochem Health. 2006 Feb-Apr;28(1-2):111-9. PubMed PMID: 16528586.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Uptake of zinc, cadmium and phosphorus by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) from a low available phosphorus calcareous soil spiked with zinc and cadmium. AU - Shen,Hong, AU - Christie,Peter, AU - Li,Xiaolin, Y1 - 2006/03/10/ PY - 2005/07/26/received PY - 2005/07/26/accepted PY - 2006/3/11/pubmed PY - 2006/9/9/medline PY - 2006/3/11/entrez SP - 111 EP - 9 JF - Environmental geochemistry and health JO - Environ Geochem Health VL - 28 IS - 1-2 N2 - In a multifactorial pot experiment, maize (Zea mays L.) with or without inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae BEG167 was grown in a sterilized soil spiked with three levels of zinc (0, 300 and 900 mg Zn kg(-1) soil) and three levels of cadmium (0, 25 and 100 mg Cd kg(-1) soil). At harvest after 8 weeks of growth, the proportion of root length of inoculated plants colonized decreased with increasing Zn or Cd addition, and was 56% in the absence of both metals and was reduced significantly to 27% in the presence of the higher levels of both metals. Mycorrhizal plants had higher biomass than non-mycorrhizal controls except at the highest soil level of Cd. Cadmium had more pronounced effects on plant biomass than did Zn at the levels studied and the two metals showed a significant interaction. The data suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation increased plant growth with enhancement of P nutrition, perhaps increasing plant tolerance to Zn and Cd by a dilution effect. AM inoculation also led to higher soil solution pH after harvest, possibly reducing the availability of the metals for plant uptake, and lowered the concentrations of soluble Zn and Cd in the soil solution, perhaps by adsorption onto the extrametrical mycelium. SN - 0269-4042 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16528586/Uptake_of_zinc_cadmium_and_phosphorus_by_arbuscular_mycorrhizal_maize__Zea_mays_L___from_a_low_available_phosphorus_calcareous_soil_spiked_with_zinc_and_cadmium_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -