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Do parents of urban children with persistent asthma ban smoking in their homes and cars?
Ambul Pediatr. 2006 Mar-Apr; 6(2):115-9.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) increases morbidity for children with asthma. One method to reduce children's ETS exposure is to completely ban smoking in the home and car. We sought to evaluate the degree to which urban children with persistent asthma are protected by household and car smoking bans, and to determine whether health care professionals are counseling parents to implement smoking bans.

METHODS

We asked parents of children with asthma to complete an in-person interview including questions about asthma symptoms, smokers in the home, smoking bans (home and car), and the receipt of ETS counseling by health care professionals.

RESULTS

We included 231 children with persistent asthma symptoms (response rate 94%). Nearly half of the children lived with a smoker. Overall, only 64% of households had complete restrictions on smoking in the home and car. Even among the children with severe persistent symptoms, less than two-thirds were protected by a complete smoking ban. Among households with smokers, only 51% had a ban on smoking in the home and 49% in the car. The majority of caregivers had been questioned by health care professionals about home smoke exposure; less were asked about exposure in the car (40%) or given suggestions to decrease the child's exposure (58%).

CONCLUSIONS

To our knowledge this is the first study to establish the prevalence of smoking bans among children with persistent asthma. Many children with asthma, even those with the most severe symptoms, remain exposed to ETS in the home and in cars. Identifying and reducing smoke exposure among these children should be a health care priority.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong, NY 14642, USA. jill_halterman@urmc.rochester.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16530150

Citation

Halterman, Jill S., et al. "Do Parents of Urban Children With Persistent Asthma Ban Smoking in Their Homes and Cars?" Ambulatory Pediatrics : the Official Journal of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, vol. 6, no. 2, 2006, pp. 115-9.
Halterman JS, Fagnano M, Conn KM, et al. Do parents of urban children with persistent asthma ban smoking in their homes and cars? Ambul Pediatr. 2006;6(2):115-9.
Halterman, J. S., Fagnano, M., Conn, K. M., & Szilagyi, P. G. (2006). Do parents of urban children with persistent asthma ban smoking in their homes and cars? Ambulatory Pediatrics : the Official Journal of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 6(2), 115-9.
Halterman JS, et al. Do Parents of Urban Children With Persistent Asthma Ban Smoking in Their Homes and Cars. Ambul Pediatr. 2006 Mar-Apr;6(2):115-9. PubMed PMID: 16530150.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do parents of urban children with persistent asthma ban smoking in their homes and cars? AU - Halterman,Jill S, AU - Fagnano,Maria, AU - Conn,Kelly M, AU - Szilagyi,Peter G, PY - 2005/08/03/received PY - 2005/10/07/revised PY - 2005/10/13/accepted PY - 2006/3/15/pubmed PY - 2006/4/14/medline PY - 2006/3/15/entrez SP - 115 EP - 9 JF - Ambulatory pediatrics : the official journal of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association JO - Ambul Pediatr VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) increases morbidity for children with asthma. One method to reduce children's ETS exposure is to completely ban smoking in the home and car. We sought to evaluate the degree to which urban children with persistent asthma are protected by household and car smoking bans, and to determine whether health care professionals are counseling parents to implement smoking bans. METHODS: We asked parents of children with asthma to complete an in-person interview including questions about asthma symptoms, smokers in the home, smoking bans (home and car), and the receipt of ETS counseling by health care professionals. RESULTS: We included 231 children with persistent asthma symptoms (response rate 94%). Nearly half of the children lived with a smoker. Overall, only 64% of households had complete restrictions on smoking in the home and car. Even among the children with severe persistent symptoms, less than two-thirds were protected by a complete smoking ban. Among households with smokers, only 51% had a ban on smoking in the home and 49% in the car. The majority of caregivers had been questioned by health care professionals about home smoke exposure; less were asked about exposure in the car (40%) or given suggestions to decrease the child's exposure (58%). CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this is the first study to establish the prevalence of smoking bans among children with persistent asthma. Many children with asthma, even those with the most severe symptoms, remain exposed to ETS in the home and in cars. Identifying and reducing smoke exposure among these children should be a health care priority. SN - 1530-1567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16530150/Do_parents_of_urban_children_with_persistent_asthma_ban_smoking_in_their_homes_and_cars L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1530-1567(05)00016-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -