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Subthalamic oscillatory activities at beta or higher frequency do not change after high-frequency DBS in Parkinson's disease.
Brain Res Bull. 2006 Mar 31; 69(2):123-30.BR

Abstract

This study aimed to assess whether changes in the patterns of local field potential (LFP) oscillations of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) underlie to the clinical improvement within 60 s after turning off subthalamic DBS. We studied by spectral analysis the STN LFPs recorded in 13 nuclei from 7 patients with Parkinson's disease before and immediately after unilateral high-frequency (130 Hz) stimulation of the same nucleus, when the clinical benefit of DBS was unchanged. The results were compared with LFP data previously reported [A. Priori, G. Foffani, A. Pesenti, F. Tamma, A.M. Bianchi, M. Pellegrini et al., Rhythm-specific pharmacological modulation of subthalamic activity in Parkinson's disease. Exp. Neurol. 189 (2004) 369-379]--namely 13 STN from 9 parkinsonian patients recorded before and after levodopa administration--which were used as a control. Before DBS, in the 'off' clinical state after overnight withdrawal of dopaminergic therapy, the STN spectrum did not significantly differ from the control nuclei, showing prominent activity at beta frequencies (13-20 and 20-35 Hz). After DBS (10-15 min) of the STN, the recorded nuclei significantly differed from the control, failing to show significant changes either in the beta bands or at higher frequencies (60-90 and 250-350 Hz). The patterns of subthalamic LFP oscillations after DBS therefore differ from those after dopaminergic medication. These results suggest (1) that subthalamic LFP modulations are not the epiphenomenon of peripheral motor improvement and (2) that the transitory clinical efficacy maintained after discontinuation of subthalamic DBS is not associated with local modulation of LFP activity at beta or higher frequencies within the STN.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Università di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico, Milan, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16533660

Citation

Foffani, G, et al. "Subthalamic Oscillatory Activities at Beta or Higher Frequency Do Not Change After High-frequency DBS in Parkinson's Disease." Brain Research Bulletin, vol. 69, no. 2, 2006, pp. 123-30.
Foffani G, Ardolino G, Egidi M, et al. Subthalamic oscillatory activities at beta or higher frequency do not change after high-frequency DBS in Parkinson's disease. Brain Res Bull. 2006;69(2):123-30.
Foffani, G., Ardolino, G., Egidi, M., Caputo, E., Bossi, B., & Priori, A. (2006). Subthalamic oscillatory activities at beta or higher frequency do not change after high-frequency DBS in Parkinson's disease. Brain Research Bulletin, 69(2), 123-30.
Foffani G, et al. Subthalamic Oscillatory Activities at Beta or Higher Frequency Do Not Change After High-frequency DBS in Parkinson's Disease. Brain Res Bull. 2006 Mar 31;69(2):123-30. PubMed PMID: 16533660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Subthalamic oscillatory activities at beta or higher frequency do not change after high-frequency DBS in Parkinson's disease. AU - Foffani,G, AU - Ardolino,G, AU - Egidi,M, AU - Caputo,E, AU - Bossi,B, AU - Priori,A, Y1 - 2005/12/13/ PY - 2005/08/19/received PY - 2005/10/27/revised PY - 2005/11/21/accepted PY - 2006/3/15/pubmed PY - 2006/6/2/medline PY - 2006/3/15/entrez SP - 123 EP - 30 JF - Brain research bulletin JO - Brain Res Bull VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - This study aimed to assess whether changes in the patterns of local field potential (LFP) oscillations of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) underlie to the clinical improvement within 60 s after turning off subthalamic DBS. We studied by spectral analysis the STN LFPs recorded in 13 nuclei from 7 patients with Parkinson's disease before and immediately after unilateral high-frequency (130 Hz) stimulation of the same nucleus, when the clinical benefit of DBS was unchanged. The results were compared with LFP data previously reported [A. Priori, G. Foffani, A. Pesenti, F. Tamma, A.M. Bianchi, M. Pellegrini et al., Rhythm-specific pharmacological modulation of subthalamic activity in Parkinson's disease. Exp. Neurol. 189 (2004) 369-379]--namely 13 STN from 9 parkinsonian patients recorded before and after levodopa administration--which were used as a control. Before DBS, in the 'off' clinical state after overnight withdrawal of dopaminergic therapy, the STN spectrum did not significantly differ from the control nuclei, showing prominent activity at beta frequencies (13-20 and 20-35 Hz). After DBS (10-15 min) of the STN, the recorded nuclei significantly differed from the control, failing to show significant changes either in the beta bands or at higher frequencies (60-90 and 250-350 Hz). The patterns of subthalamic LFP oscillations after DBS therefore differ from those after dopaminergic medication. These results suggest (1) that subthalamic LFP modulations are not the epiphenomenon of peripheral motor improvement and (2) that the transitory clinical efficacy maintained after discontinuation of subthalamic DBS is not associated with local modulation of LFP activity at beta or higher frequencies within the STN. SN - 0361-9230 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16533660/Subthalamic_oscillatory_activities_at_beta_or_higher_frequency_do_not_change_after_high_frequency_DBS_in_Parkinson's_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -