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Benefits of telephone care over primary care for smoking cessation: a randomized trial.
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Mar 13; 166(5):536-42.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Brief clinician intervention and telephone counseling are both effective aids for smoking cessation. However, the potential benefit of telephone care above and beyond routine clinician intervention has not been examined previously. The objective of this study is to determine if telephone care increases smoking cessation compared with brief clinician intervention as part of routine health care.

METHODS

This 2-group, prospective, randomized controlled trial enrolled 837 daily smokers from 5 Veterans Affairs medical centers in the upper Midwest. The telephone care group (n = 417) received behavioral counseling with mailing of smoking cessation medications as clinically indicated. The standard care group (n = 420) received intervention as part of routine health care. The primary outcome was self-reported 6-month duration of abstinence 12 months after enrollment. Secondary outcomes were 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 and 12 months, participation in counseling programs, and use of smoking cessation medications.

RESULTS

Using intention-to-treat procedures, we found that the rate of 6-month abstinence at the 12-month follow-up was 13.0% in the telephone care group and 4.1% in the standard care group (odds ratio [OR], 3.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99-6.15). The rate of 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months was 39.6% in the telephone care group and 10.1% in the standard care group (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 4.02-8.50). Telephone care compared with standard care increased the rates of participation in counseling programs (97.1% vs 24.0%; OR, 96.22; 95% CI, 52.57-176.11) and use of smoking cessation medications (89.6% vs 52.3%; OR, 7.85; 95% CI, 5.34-11.53).

CONCLUSION

Telephone care increases the use of behavioral and pharmacologic assistance and leads to higher smoking cessation rates compared with routine health care provider intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA. lcan@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16534040

Citation

An, Lawrence C., et al. "Benefits of Telephone Care Over Primary Care for Smoking Cessation: a Randomized Trial." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 166, no. 5, 2006, pp. 536-42.
An LC, Zhu SH, Nelson DB, et al. Benefits of telephone care over primary care for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(5):536-42.
An, L. C., Zhu, S. H., Nelson, D. B., Arikian, N. J., Nugent, S., Partin, M. R., & Joseph, A. M. (2006). Benefits of telephone care over primary care for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. Archives of Internal Medicine, 166(5), 536-42.
An LC, et al. Benefits of Telephone Care Over Primary Care for Smoking Cessation: a Randomized Trial. Arch Intern Med. 2006 Mar 13;166(5):536-42. PubMed PMID: 16534040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benefits of telephone care over primary care for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. AU - An,Lawrence C, AU - Zhu,Shu-Hong, AU - Nelson,David B, AU - Arikian,Nancy J, AU - Nugent,Sean, AU - Partin,Melissa R, AU - Joseph,Anne M, PY - 2006/3/15/pubmed PY - 2006/3/31/medline PY - 2006/3/15/entrez SP - 536 EP - 42 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 166 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Brief clinician intervention and telephone counseling are both effective aids for smoking cessation. However, the potential benefit of telephone care above and beyond routine clinician intervention has not been examined previously. The objective of this study is to determine if telephone care increases smoking cessation compared with brief clinician intervention as part of routine health care. METHODS: This 2-group, prospective, randomized controlled trial enrolled 837 daily smokers from 5 Veterans Affairs medical centers in the upper Midwest. The telephone care group (n = 417) received behavioral counseling with mailing of smoking cessation medications as clinically indicated. The standard care group (n = 420) received intervention as part of routine health care. The primary outcome was self-reported 6-month duration of abstinence 12 months after enrollment. Secondary outcomes were 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 and 12 months, participation in counseling programs, and use of smoking cessation medications. RESULTS: Using intention-to-treat procedures, we found that the rate of 6-month abstinence at the 12-month follow-up was 13.0% in the telephone care group and 4.1% in the standard care group (odds ratio [OR], 3.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99-6.15). The rate of 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months was 39.6% in the telephone care group and 10.1% in the standard care group (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 4.02-8.50). Telephone care compared with standard care increased the rates of participation in counseling programs (97.1% vs 24.0%; OR, 96.22; 95% CI, 52.57-176.11) and use of smoking cessation medications (89.6% vs 52.3%; OR, 7.85; 95% CI, 5.34-11.53). CONCLUSION: Telephone care increases the use of behavioral and pharmacologic assistance and leads to higher smoking cessation rates compared with routine health care provider intervention. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16534040/Benefits_of_telephone_care_over_primary_care_for_smoking_cessation:_a_randomized_trial_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -