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Traumatic experiences and psychological distress in an urban refugee population seeking treatment services.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006 Mar; 194(3):188-94.JN

Abstract

While a growing literature has addressed the psychological consequences of torture and refugee trauma, most studies have focused on homogeneous samples drawn from a single region. Thus, relatively little research has attempted to identify demographic or experiential factors that might help explain different levels of distress in these individuals. We measured depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a convenience sample of refugees and survivors of torture seeking treatment in a torture treatment program (N = 325). We found 81.1% of patients had clinically significant anxiety, 84.5% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, and 45.7% had significant PTSD symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that anxiety and depressive symptom were significant higher among women (beta = .08, p = 0.02 and beta = .22, p = 0.0001 for anxiety and depression respectively) and those who reported death threats as part of their traumatic experiences (beta = .10, p = 0.033 and beta = .12, p = 0.036 respectively). Symptoms of PTSD were also predicted by death threats (beta = .22, p = 0.03), but were also influenced by the experience of rape (beta = .33, p < 0.001), family torture experiences (beta = .23, p = 0.022), religion (beta = .21, p = 0.03), and age (beta = -.18, p = 0.004). The clinical implications of these results are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program for Survivors of Torture, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16534436

Citation

Keller, Allen, et al. "Traumatic Experiences and Psychological Distress in an Urban Refugee Population Seeking Treatment Services." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 194, no. 3, 2006, pp. 188-94.
Keller A, Lhewa D, Rosenfeld B, et al. Traumatic experiences and psychological distress in an urban refugee population seeking treatment services. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006;194(3):188-94.
Keller, A., Lhewa, D., Rosenfeld, B., Sachs, E., Aladjem, A., Cohen, I., Smith, H., & Porterfield, K. (2006). Traumatic experiences and psychological distress in an urban refugee population seeking treatment services. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 194(3), 188-94.
Keller A, et al. Traumatic Experiences and Psychological Distress in an Urban Refugee Population Seeking Treatment Services. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006;194(3):188-94. PubMed PMID: 16534436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traumatic experiences and psychological distress in an urban refugee population seeking treatment services. AU - Keller,Allen, AU - Lhewa,Dechen, AU - Rosenfeld,Barry, AU - Sachs,Emily, AU - Aladjem,Asher, AU - Cohen,Ilene, AU - Smith,Hawthorne, AU - Porterfield,Katherine, PY - 2006/3/15/pubmed PY - 2006/4/19/medline PY - 2006/3/15/entrez SP - 188 EP - 94 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 194 IS - 3 N2 - While a growing literature has addressed the psychological consequences of torture and refugee trauma, most studies have focused on homogeneous samples drawn from a single region. Thus, relatively little research has attempted to identify demographic or experiential factors that might help explain different levels of distress in these individuals. We measured depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a convenience sample of refugees and survivors of torture seeking treatment in a torture treatment program (N = 325). We found 81.1% of patients had clinically significant anxiety, 84.5% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, and 45.7% had significant PTSD symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that anxiety and depressive symptom were significant higher among women (beta = .08, p = 0.02 and beta = .22, p = 0.0001 for anxiety and depression respectively) and those who reported death threats as part of their traumatic experiences (beta = .10, p = 0.033 and beta = .12, p = 0.036 respectively). Symptoms of PTSD were also predicted by death threats (beta = .22, p = 0.03), but were also influenced by the experience of rape (beta = .33, p < 0.001), family torture experiences (beta = .23, p = 0.022), religion (beta = .21, p = 0.03), and age (beta = -.18, p = 0.004). The clinical implications of these results are discussed. SN - 0022-3018 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16534436/Traumatic_experiences_and_psychological_distress_in_an_urban_refugee_population_seeking_treatment_services_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nmd.0000202494.75723.83 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -