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Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Selenium is an essential trace element found in cereals, wheat, dairy products, meat, and fish. This micronutrient may prevent carcinogenesis through several biochemical pathways; one suggested pathway is enhanced apoptosis.

OBJECTIVES

The relation between selenium and colorectal adenomas was evaluated because the colorectal adenoma is the established precursor lesion of most colorectal cancers. Apoptosis was a pathway of interest because decreased apoptosis has been associated with an increased prevalence of adenomas. Our objectives were as follows: to investigate the association between (a) selenium and colorectal adenomas and (b) selenium and apoptosis.

METHODS

The study population was assembled for the Diet and Health Study III (n = 803), a cross-sectional study conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospital (Chapel Hill, NC). There were 451 participants in the analysis of selenium and adenoma prevalence and 351 participants in the analysis of selenium and apoptosis. Selenium was measured from serum collected at the time of colonoscopy. Apoptosis was measured in biopsies from normal rectal epithelium obtained during the colonoscopy procedure.

RESULTS

Participants in the highest fifth of serum selenium were less likely to have adenomas in comparison with those in the lowest fifth (prevalence ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.1). Selenium and apoptosis (>2.76 cells per crypt) were not strongly related, but results collectively suggested a roughly inverse association.

CONCLUSIONS

High selenium was associated with a reduced prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Apoptosis, however, did not seem to be the mechanism by which selenium was related to adenoma prevalence in our data.

Authors+Show Affiliations

R. Stuart Dickson Institute for Health Studies, 720 East Morehead Street, Charlotte, NC 28232, USA. aconnell@email.unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16537706

Citation

Connelly-Frost, Alexandra, et al. "Selenium, Apoptosis, and Colorectal Adenomas." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 15, no. 3, 2006, pp. 486-93.
Connelly-Frost A, Poole C, Satia JA, et al. Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(3):486-93.
Connelly-Frost, A., Poole, C., Satia, J. A., Kupper, L. L., Millikan, R. C., & Sandler, R. S. (2006). Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 15(3), pp. 486-93.
Connelly-Frost A, et al. Selenium, Apoptosis, and Colorectal Adenomas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(3):486-93. PubMed PMID: 16537706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas. AU - Connelly-Frost,Alexandra, AU - Poole,Charles, AU - Satia,Jessie A, AU - Kupper,Lawrence L, AU - Millikan,Robert C, AU - Sandler,Robert S, PY - 2006/3/16/pubmed PY - 2006/7/20/medline PY - 2006/3/16/entrez SP - 486 EP - 93 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Selenium is an essential trace element found in cereals, wheat, dairy products, meat, and fish. This micronutrient may prevent carcinogenesis through several biochemical pathways; one suggested pathway is enhanced apoptosis. OBJECTIVES: The relation between selenium and colorectal adenomas was evaluated because the colorectal adenoma is the established precursor lesion of most colorectal cancers. Apoptosis was a pathway of interest because decreased apoptosis has been associated with an increased prevalence of adenomas. Our objectives were as follows: to investigate the association between (a) selenium and colorectal adenomas and (b) selenium and apoptosis. METHODS: The study population was assembled for the Diet and Health Study III (n = 803), a cross-sectional study conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospital (Chapel Hill, NC). There were 451 participants in the analysis of selenium and adenoma prevalence and 351 participants in the analysis of selenium and apoptosis. Selenium was measured from serum collected at the time of colonoscopy. Apoptosis was measured in biopsies from normal rectal epithelium obtained during the colonoscopy procedure. RESULTS: Participants in the highest fifth of serum selenium were less likely to have adenomas in comparison with those in the lowest fifth (prevalence ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.1). Selenium and apoptosis (>2.76 cells per crypt) were not strongly related, but results collectively suggested a roughly inverse association. CONCLUSIONS: High selenium was associated with a reduced prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Apoptosis, however, did not seem to be the mechanism by which selenium was related to adenoma prevalence in our data. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16537706/Selenium_apoptosis_and_colorectal_adenomas_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16537706 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -