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Polyunsaturated fatty acids and anthropometric indices of children in rural China.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Sep; 60(9):1100-7.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To define fatty acid and macronutrient intakes in a rural Chinese preschool population, and relate these intakes to anthropometric indices.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey of anthropometry and diet (three 24-h recalls). National Centers for Health Statistics/World Health Organization growth reference charts were used to determine the prevalence of malnutrition (z-scores less than -2 standard deviation (s.d.) below the mean): height-for-age (stunted), weight-for-age (underweight), weight-for-height (wasted) and mid-upper-arm-circumference-for-age (low fat/muscle).

SUBJECTS AND SETTING

A total of 196 children aged 1-5 years old were volunteered by their families to participate in the survey, located in Heqing County, Yunnan Province, China.

RESULTS

The respective prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and low fat/muscle was: 38, 21, 2 and 8%. Daily intakes of linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; 18:3n-3), arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), averaged for all children, were 2 100+/-1200, 300+/-250, 55+/-35 and 30+/-140 mg/day, respectively. As percent of total fat intake, LA contributed 11.9%, LNA 1.8%, AA 0.3% and DHA 0.2%. Height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores were negatively correlated with g/kg/day intake of LA and AA (P<0.05). Weight-for-height z-score was negatively correlated with AA g/kg/day intake (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

This study provided polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intakes in rural preschool children in a developing country. The associations of PUFA intake with early childhood growth suggest that growth in preschool-aged children could be significantly and specifically related to n-6 fatty acid intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. bobbibarbarich@capitalhealth.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16538238

Citation

Barbarich, B N., et al. "Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Anthropometric Indices of Children in Rural China." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 60, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1100-7.
Barbarich BN, Willows ND, Wang L, et al. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and anthropometric indices of children in rural China. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(9):1100-7.
Barbarich, B. N., Willows, N. D., Wang, L., & Clandinin, M. T. (2006). Polyunsaturated fatty acids and anthropometric indices of children in rural China. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 60(9), 1100-7.
Barbarich BN, et al. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Anthropometric Indices of Children in Rural China. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(9):1100-7. PubMed PMID: 16538238.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polyunsaturated fatty acids and anthropometric indices of children in rural China. AU - Barbarich,B N, AU - Willows,N D, AU - Wang,L, AU - Clandinin,M T, Y1 - 2006/03/15/ PY - 2006/3/16/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/3/16/entrez SP - 1100 EP - 7 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 60 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To define fatty acid and macronutrient intakes in a rural Chinese preschool population, and relate these intakes to anthropometric indices. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of anthropometry and diet (three 24-h recalls). National Centers for Health Statistics/World Health Organization growth reference charts were used to determine the prevalence of malnutrition (z-scores less than -2 standard deviation (s.d.) below the mean): height-for-age (stunted), weight-for-age (underweight), weight-for-height (wasted) and mid-upper-arm-circumference-for-age (low fat/muscle). SUBJECTS AND SETTING: A total of 196 children aged 1-5 years old were volunteered by their families to participate in the survey, located in Heqing County, Yunnan Province, China. RESULTS: The respective prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and low fat/muscle was: 38, 21, 2 and 8%. Daily intakes of linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; 18:3n-3), arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), averaged for all children, were 2 100+/-1200, 300+/-250, 55+/-35 and 30+/-140 mg/day, respectively. As percent of total fat intake, LA contributed 11.9%, LNA 1.8%, AA 0.3% and DHA 0.2%. Height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores were negatively correlated with g/kg/day intake of LA and AA (P<0.05). Weight-for-height z-score was negatively correlated with AA g/kg/day intake (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study provided polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intakes in rural preschool children in a developing country. The associations of PUFA intake with early childhood growth suggest that growth in preschool-aged children could be significantly and specifically related to n-6 fatty acid intakes. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16538238/Polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_and_anthropometric_indices_of_children_in_rural_China_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602424 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -