Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during cognitive behavioral stress management with HIV-Positive gay men treated with HAART.
Ann Behav Med 2006; 31(2):155-64AB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Stress management interventions for HIV-positive persons have been designed to enhance coping skills and encourage health-promoting behaviors with the hope of decreasing distress and slowing disease progression.

PURPOSE

We examined the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention in combination with medication adherence training (MAT) in 130 gay and bisexual men living with HIV infection.

METHODS

Participants were randomized to either a 10-week CBSM+MAT intervention (n = 76) or a MAT-only condition (n = 54). Measures of self-reported adherence, active cognitive coping (i.e., acceptance and positive reinterpretation), avoidant coping (i.e., denial and behavioral disengagement), and depressed mood were examined over the 10-week intervention period.

RESULTS

Men in CBSM+MAT reported reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during the 10-week intervention period, but no changes in active cognitive coping or self-reported adherence were observed. Using path analysis, greater reliance on denial coping at baseline was associated with decreased depressed mood at 10 weeks. We also determined that CBSM+MAT may decrease depressed mood by reducing reliance on denial coping over the 10-week intervention period.

CONCLUSIONS

Although denial may be an effective means of distress reduction in the short term, reliance on this coping strategy may result in a decreased capacity to effectively manage a variety of disease-related stressors in the long term. CBSM+MAT addresses this potentially detrimental pattern by teaching stress reduction skills that may decrease depressed mood via reduced reliance on denial coping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Miami, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16542130

Citation

Carrico, Adam W., et al. "Reductions in Depressed Mood and Denial Coping During Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management With HIV-Positive Gay Men Treated With HAART." Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 31, no. 2, 2006, pp. 155-64.
Carrico AW, Antoni MH, Duran RE, et al. Reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during cognitive behavioral stress management with HIV-Positive gay men treated with HAART. Ann Behav Med. 2006;31(2):155-64.
Carrico, A. W., Antoni, M. H., Duran, R. E., Ironson, G., Penedo, F., Fletcher, M. A., ... Schneiderman, N. (2006). Reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during cognitive behavioral stress management with HIV-Positive gay men treated with HAART. Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 31(2), pp. 155-64.
Carrico AW, et al. Reductions in Depressed Mood and Denial Coping During Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management With HIV-Positive Gay Men Treated With HAART. Ann Behav Med. 2006;31(2):155-64. PubMed PMID: 16542130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during cognitive behavioral stress management with HIV-Positive gay men treated with HAART. AU - Carrico,Adam W, AU - Antoni,Michael H, AU - Duran,Ron E, AU - Ironson,Gail, AU - Penedo,Frank, AU - Fletcher,Mary Ann, AU - Klimas,Nancy, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, PY - 2006/3/18/pubmed PY - 2006/8/25/medline PY - 2006/3/18/entrez SP - 155 EP - 64 JF - Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine JO - Ann Behav Med VL - 31 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Stress management interventions for HIV-positive persons have been designed to enhance coping skills and encourage health-promoting behaviors with the hope of decreasing distress and slowing disease progression. PURPOSE: We examined the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention in combination with medication adherence training (MAT) in 130 gay and bisexual men living with HIV infection. METHODS: Participants were randomized to either a 10-week CBSM+MAT intervention (n = 76) or a MAT-only condition (n = 54). Measures of self-reported adherence, active cognitive coping (i.e., acceptance and positive reinterpretation), avoidant coping (i.e., denial and behavioral disengagement), and depressed mood were examined over the 10-week intervention period. RESULTS: Men in CBSM+MAT reported reductions in depressed mood and denial coping during the 10-week intervention period, but no changes in active cognitive coping or self-reported adherence were observed. Using path analysis, greater reliance on denial coping at baseline was associated with decreased depressed mood at 10 weeks. We also determined that CBSM+MAT may decrease depressed mood by reducing reliance on denial coping over the 10-week intervention period. CONCLUSIONS: Although denial may be an effective means of distress reduction in the short term, reliance on this coping strategy may result in a decreased capacity to effectively manage a variety of disease-related stressors in the long term. CBSM+MAT addresses this potentially detrimental pattern by teaching stress reduction skills that may decrease depressed mood via reduced reliance on denial coping. SN - 0883-6612 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16542130/Reductions_in_depressed_mood_and_denial_coping_during_cognitive_behavioral_stress_management_with_HIV_Positive_gay_men_treated_with_HAART_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/abm/article-lookup/doi/10.1207/s15324796abm3102_7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -