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Nasal and bronchial tolerability of Rofecoxib in patients with aspirin induced asthma.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Jan; 38(1):10-4.EA

Abstract

Aspirin (ASA) and several other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme both isoforms 1 and 2, and can precipitate asthmatic attacks in aspirin-induced asthmatics. Rofecoxib (R) is a novel and specific COX-2 inhibitor which is caracterized by an highly selective COX-2 inhibition, and can be presumed as non cross-reactive with ASA. Aim of the study was to assess the bronchial and the nasal response to R in AIA.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Nineteen subjects with AIA (21-54 years, 7 m, mean FEV1 85.1% pred. +/- 5.4 sd) performed two oral provocation tests: one with increasing doses of ASA and one other of R at a time interval of 2 weeks, according to a randomized, cross-over design. The bronchial and the nasal responses were measured by serial measures of FEV1, and of nasal resistences by acoustic rhinomanometry, respectively.

STATISTICS

Anova for trends was used, and p<0.05 accepted.

RESULTS

Mean ASA PD20 was 68.3 mg +/- 12.4 sd. ASA induced a significant broncho-constriction in all patients with AIA: basal FEV1 dropped from 88.9% pred. +/- 6.2sd to 70.1% pred. +/- 6.9sd after 60 min. (Anova p = 0.001). Despite ASA, R was well tolerated: basal FEV1 remained unchanged during the period of observation following the R 25mg ingestion. ASA also precipitated a significant nasal response with increased nasal resistances (anova p < 0.001) and reduced volumes (anova p < 0.001). The nasal function was unchanged following R 25mg.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite ASA, Rofecoxib, largely due to its highly specificity for COX-2, proved a drug particularly safe in treating patients with AIA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lung Dept., Orlandi Hospital, Bussolengo, Verona, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16544582

Citation

Micheletto, C, et al. "Nasal and Bronchial Tolerability of Rofecoxib in Patients With Aspirin Induced Asthma." European Annals of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 38, no. 1, 2006, pp. 10-4.
Micheletto C, Tognella S, Guerriero M, et al. Nasal and bronchial tolerability of Rofecoxib in patients with aspirin induced asthma. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;38(1):10-4.
Micheletto, C., Tognella, S., Guerriero, M., & Dal Negro, R. (2006). Nasal and bronchial tolerability of Rofecoxib in patients with aspirin induced asthma. European Annals of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 38(1), 10-4.
Micheletto C, et al. Nasal and Bronchial Tolerability of Rofecoxib in Patients With Aspirin Induced Asthma. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;38(1):10-4. PubMed PMID: 16544582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nasal and bronchial tolerability of Rofecoxib in patients with aspirin induced asthma. AU - Micheletto,C, AU - Tognella,S, AU - Guerriero,M, AU - Dal Negro,R, PY - 2006/3/21/pubmed PY - 2006/4/14/medline PY - 2006/3/21/entrez SP - 10 EP - 4 JF - European annals of allergy and clinical immunology JO - Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - UNLABELLED: Aspirin (ASA) and several other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme both isoforms 1 and 2, and can precipitate asthmatic attacks in aspirin-induced asthmatics. Rofecoxib (R) is a novel and specific COX-2 inhibitor which is caracterized by an highly selective COX-2 inhibition, and can be presumed as non cross-reactive with ASA. Aim of the study was to assess the bronchial and the nasal response to R in AIA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen subjects with AIA (21-54 years, 7 m, mean FEV1 85.1% pred. +/- 5.4 sd) performed two oral provocation tests: one with increasing doses of ASA and one other of R at a time interval of 2 weeks, according to a randomized, cross-over design. The bronchial and the nasal responses were measured by serial measures of FEV1, and of nasal resistences by acoustic rhinomanometry, respectively. STATISTICS: Anova for trends was used, and p<0.05 accepted. RESULTS: Mean ASA PD20 was 68.3 mg +/- 12.4 sd. ASA induced a significant broncho-constriction in all patients with AIA: basal FEV1 dropped from 88.9% pred. +/- 6.2sd to 70.1% pred. +/- 6.9sd after 60 min. (Anova p = 0.001). Despite ASA, R was well tolerated: basal FEV1 remained unchanged during the period of observation following the R 25mg ingestion. ASA also precipitated a significant nasal response with increased nasal resistances (anova p < 0.001) and reduced volumes (anova p < 0.001). The nasal function was unchanged following R 25mg. CONCLUSIONS: Despite ASA, Rofecoxib, largely due to its highly specificity for COX-2, proved a drug particularly safe in treating patients with AIA. SN - 1764-1489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16544582/Nasal_and_bronchial_tolerability_of_Rofecoxib_in_patients_with_aspirin_induced_asthma_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -