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Sudden onset of sleep and dopaminergic therapy in patients with restless legs syndrome.
Sleep Med. 2006 Jun; 7(4):333-9.SM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Sudden onset of sleep (SOS) was recently reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) under dopaminergic treatment. Here, we investigated as to what extent SOS is found in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), who are frequently treated with dopaminergic drugs, and controls.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

A questionnaire survey on SOS was administered to 156 RLS patients and 126 controls.

RESULTS

While no significant difference between RLS patients and controls was detected in Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores (P=0.76), the prevalence of SOS was higher in RLS patients (32.7%) than in controls (19.8%) (P=0.02). Significant predictors of SOS in RLS were ESS score (odds ratio (OR) 16.4), male sex (OR 4.6), duration of night-time sleep (OR 3.0), and age (OR 2.9), while no association was observed for duration or severity of the disease. Patients on dopaminergic therapy usually featured a lower risk of SOS than untreated patients. Falling asleep while driving was reported by 14.6% of all RLS patients with a driver's license and associated with increased risk of accident (OR 7.1).

CONCLUSIONS

RLS patients who are untreated, male, and elderly should be assessed for the presence of SOS. In contrast to PD, dopaminergic drugs may reduce the risk of SOS in RLS. The possible benefit of the drugs should be investigated particularly in male patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Philipps-University, 35033 Marburg, Germany. moellerc@staff.uni-marburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16554184

Citation

Möller, Jens Carsten, et al. "Sudden Onset of Sleep and Dopaminergic Therapy in Patients With Restless Legs Syndrome." Sleep Medicine, vol. 7, no. 4, 2006, pp. 333-9.
Möller JC, Körner Y, Cassel W, et al. Sudden onset of sleep and dopaminergic therapy in patients with restless legs syndrome. Sleep Med. 2006;7(4):333-9.
Möller, J. C., Körner, Y., Cassel, W., Meindorfner, C., Krüger, H. P., Oertel, W. H., & Stiasny-Kolster, K. (2006). Sudden onset of sleep and dopaminergic therapy in patients with restless legs syndrome. Sleep Medicine, 7(4), 333-9.
Möller JC, et al. Sudden Onset of Sleep and Dopaminergic Therapy in Patients With Restless Legs Syndrome. Sleep Med. 2006;7(4):333-9. PubMed PMID: 16554184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sudden onset of sleep and dopaminergic therapy in patients with restless legs syndrome. AU - Möller,Jens Carsten, AU - Körner,Yvonne, AU - Cassel,Werner, AU - Meindorfner,Charlotte, AU - Krüger,Hans-Peter, AU - Oertel,Wolfgang H, AU - Stiasny-Kolster,Karin, Y1 - 2006/03/22/ PY - 2005/03/29/received PY - 2005/07/29/revised PY - 2005/08/07/accepted PY - 2006/3/24/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/3/24/entrez SP - 333 EP - 9 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Sudden onset of sleep (SOS) was recently reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) under dopaminergic treatment. Here, we investigated as to what extent SOS is found in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), who are frequently treated with dopaminergic drugs, and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire survey on SOS was administered to 156 RLS patients and 126 controls. RESULTS: While no significant difference between RLS patients and controls was detected in Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores (P=0.76), the prevalence of SOS was higher in RLS patients (32.7%) than in controls (19.8%) (P=0.02). Significant predictors of SOS in RLS were ESS score (odds ratio (OR) 16.4), male sex (OR 4.6), duration of night-time sleep (OR 3.0), and age (OR 2.9), while no association was observed for duration or severity of the disease. Patients on dopaminergic therapy usually featured a lower risk of SOS than untreated patients. Falling asleep while driving was reported by 14.6% of all RLS patients with a driver's license and associated with increased risk of accident (OR 7.1). CONCLUSIONS: RLS patients who are untreated, male, and elderly should be assessed for the presence of SOS. In contrast to PD, dopaminergic drugs may reduce the risk of SOS in RLS. The possible benefit of the drugs should be investigated particularly in male patients. SN - 1389-9457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16554184/Sudden_onset_of_sleep_and_dopaminergic_therapy_in_patients_with_restless_legs_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(05)00191-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -