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Acute mental stress has a prolonged unfavorable effect on arterial stiffness and wave reflections.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Large-artery stiffness and arterial wave reflections have been identified as independent markers and prognosticators of cardiovascular risk. Mental stress is a novel risk factor for coronary artery disease and has been associated with left ventricular dysfunction, myocardial ischemia and infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of acute mental stress on aortic stiffness and wave reflections.

METHODS

The effect of a mental arithmetic test was assessed in 19 healthy individuals using a randomized, sham-procedure-controlled, crossover design. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured as indices of aortic stiffness and wave reflections, respectively.

RESULTS

Mental stress induced a sustained increase in central systolic and pulse pressure throughout the whole study (systolic: by 7.5 mm Hg, p < .05; pulse: by 5.7 mm Hg, p < .01). The increase in peripheral systolic and pulse pressure was not significant throughout the study, but only when their peak values were compared with baseline (systolic: by 6.2 mm Hg, peak at 0 minutes; pulse: by 6.6 mm Hg, peak at 5 minutes, p < .05 for both). There was a sustained increase in pulse wave velocity (by 0.57 m/s, p < .005) throughout the study denoting a sustained increase in aortic stiffness. Similarly, augmentation index showed a sustained increase with mental stress (by 6.16%, p < .05) denoting increased wave reflections from the periphery.

CONCLUSION

Acute mental stress results in a prolonged increase in aortic stiffness and wave reflections. Given the important pathophysiologic and prognostic role of these parameters, our results provide important mechanistic links between acute mental stress and increased cardiovascular risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Cardiology, Athens Medical School, Hippokration Hospital, Athens, Greece. cvlachop@otenet.gr

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aortic Diseases
    Blood Pressure
    Cross-Over Studies
    Elasticity
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Manometry
    Risk
    Stress, Psychological

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16554388

    Citation

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos, et al. "Acute Mental Stress Has a Prolonged Unfavorable Effect On Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflections." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 68, no. 2, 2006, pp. 231-7.
    Vlachopoulos C, Kosmopoulou F, Alexopoulos N, et al. Acute mental stress has a prolonged unfavorable effect on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. Psychosom Med. 2006;68(2):231-7.
    Vlachopoulos, C., Kosmopoulou, F., Alexopoulos, N., Ioakeimidis, N., Siasos, G., & Stefanadis, C. (2006). Acute mental stress has a prolonged unfavorable effect on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. Psychosomatic Medicine, 68(2), pp. 231-7.
    Vlachopoulos C, et al. Acute Mental Stress Has a Prolonged Unfavorable Effect On Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflections. Psychosom Med. 2006;68(2):231-7. PubMed PMID: 16554388.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Acute mental stress has a prolonged unfavorable effect on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. AU - Vlachopoulos,Charalambos, AU - Kosmopoulou,Foteini, AU - Alexopoulos,Nikolaos, AU - Ioakeimidis,Nikolaos, AU - Siasos,Gerasimos, AU - Stefanadis,Christodoulos, PY - 2006/3/24/pubmed PY - 2006/7/19/medline PY - 2006/3/24/entrez SP - 231 EP - 7 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 68 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Large-artery stiffness and arterial wave reflections have been identified as independent markers and prognosticators of cardiovascular risk. Mental stress is a novel risk factor for coronary artery disease and has been associated with left ventricular dysfunction, myocardial ischemia and infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of acute mental stress on aortic stiffness and wave reflections. METHODS: The effect of a mental arithmetic test was assessed in 19 healthy individuals using a randomized, sham-procedure-controlled, crossover design. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured as indices of aortic stiffness and wave reflections, respectively. RESULTS: Mental stress induced a sustained increase in central systolic and pulse pressure throughout the whole study (systolic: by 7.5 mm Hg, p < .05; pulse: by 5.7 mm Hg, p < .01). The increase in peripheral systolic and pulse pressure was not significant throughout the study, but only when their peak values were compared with baseline (systolic: by 6.2 mm Hg, peak at 0 minutes; pulse: by 6.6 mm Hg, peak at 5 minutes, p < .05 for both). There was a sustained increase in pulse wave velocity (by 0.57 m/s, p < .005) throughout the study denoting a sustained increase in aortic stiffness. Similarly, augmentation index showed a sustained increase with mental stress (by 6.16%, p < .05) denoting increased wave reflections from the periphery. CONCLUSION: Acute mental stress results in a prolonged increase in aortic stiffness and wave reflections. Given the important pathophysiologic and prognostic role of these parameters, our results provide important mechanistic links between acute mental stress and increased cardiovascular risk. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16554388/Acute_mental_stress_has_a_prolonged_unfavorable_effect_on_arterial_stiffness_and_wave_reflections_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16554388 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -