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Neurobehavioral profiles during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal in adolescent and adult Sprague-Dawley rats.
Behav Brain Res. 2006 Jun 03; 170(1):41-51.BB

Abstract

RATIONALE

Adolescent and adult rats show differential sensitivity to many of the effects of ethanol.

OBJECTIVES

The current studies were designed to further explore differences in the development of ethanol dependence by examining anxiety-like behavior, acoustic startle, prepulse inhibition, and EEG activity during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal.

METHODS

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol vapor (12h/day for 14 days) during adolescence or adulthood. Neurobehavioral assessments were performed before exposure began and then during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal (i.e., 7-10h after the termination of daily ethanol exposure).

RESULTS

Behavior in the light-dark box did not reveal indices of pronounced anxiety-like behavior in ethanol exposed rats from either age group during withdrawal. Acoustic startle magnitude was significantly reduced and prepulse inhibition significantly enhanced in ethanol exposed rats during withdrawal, but these changes were independent of age. Frontal cortical EEG activity was not altered during ethanol withdrawal, but high frequency power in the parietal power EEG (i.e., 16-32 and 32-50 Hz) was selectively increased in ethanol exposed adolescents.

CONCLUSIONS

The overall indices of ethanol withdrawal observed in these studies were mild, but these data do support the hypothesis that ethanol withdrawal symptoms can differentially develop in adolescent and adult rats. However, sensitivity to ethanol during adolescence can be increased or decreased depending on the symptom being assessed. As a result, it is unclear if more rapid development of ethanol dependence in adolescents is a factor, which facilitates the development of alcoholism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Scripps Research Institute, Molecular and Integrative Neuroscience Department, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. cslawecki@scripps.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16563530

Citation

Slawecki, Craig J., et al. "Neurobehavioral Profiles During the Acute Phase of Ethanol Withdrawal in Adolescent and Adult Sprague-Dawley Rats." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 170, no. 1, 2006, pp. 41-51.
Slawecki CJ, Roth J, Gilder A. Neurobehavioral profiles during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal in adolescent and adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Behav Brain Res. 2006;170(1):41-51.
Slawecki, C. J., Roth, J., & Gilder, A. (2006). Neurobehavioral profiles during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal in adolescent and adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 170(1), 41-51.
Slawecki CJ, Roth J, Gilder A. Neurobehavioral Profiles During the Acute Phase of Ethanol Withdrawal in Adolescent and Adult Sprague-Dawley Rats. Behav Brain Res. 2006 Jun 3;170(1):41-51. PubMed PMID: 16563530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurobehavioral profiles during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal in adolescent and adult Sprague-Dawley rats. AU - Slawecki,Craig J, AU - Roth,Jennifer, AU - Gilder,Allison, Y1 - 2006/03/24/ PY - 2005/09/15/received PY - 2006/01/25/revised PY - 2006/01/26/accepted PY - 2006/3/28/pubmed PY - 2006/10/13/medline PY - 2006/3/28/entrez SP - 41 EP - 51 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav. Brain Res. VL - 170 IS - 1 N2 - RATIONALE: Adolescent and adult rats show differential sensitivity to many of the effects of ethanol. OBJECTIVES: The current studies were designed to further explore differences in the development of ethanol dependence by examining anxiety-like behavior, acoustic startle, prepulse inhibition, and EEG activity during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol vapor (12h/day for 14 days) during adolescence or adulthood. Neurobehavioral assessments were performed before exposure began and then during the acute phase of ethanol withdrawal (i.e., 7-10h after the termination of daily ethanol exposure). RESULTS: Behavior in the light-dark box did not reveal indices of pronounced anxiety-like behavior in ethanol exposed rats from either age group during withdrawal. Acoustic startle magnitude was significantly reduced and prepulse inhibition significantly enhanced in ethanol exposed rats during withdrawal, but these changes were independent of age. Frontal cortical EEG activity was not altered during ethanol withdrawal, but high frequency power in the parietal power EEG (i.e., 16-32 and 32-50 Hz) was selectively increased in ethanol exposed adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: The overall indices of ethanol withdrawal observed in these studies were mild, but these data do support the hypothesis that ethanol withdrawal symptoms can differentially develop in adolescent and adult rats. However, sensitivity to ethanol during adolescence can be increased or decreased depending on the symptom being assessed. As a result, it is unclear if more rapid development of ethanol dependence in adolescents is a factor, which facilitates the development of alcoholism. SN - 0166-4328 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16563530/Neurobehavioral_profiles_during_the_acute_phase_of_ethanol_withdrawal_in_adolescent_and_adult_Sprague_Dawley_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(06)00092-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -