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Apolipoprotein-B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the long-term risk of coronary heart disease in men.
Am J Cardiol. 2006 Apr 01; 97(7):997-1001.AJ

Abstract

We examined whether plasma apolipoprotein-B (apo-B) levels add further information on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) after taking into account low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations and other traditional risk factors. Among 2,072 CHD-free men from the Québec Cardiovascular Study at entry and followed for 13 years, 230 had a first CHD event (CHD death or nonfatal myocardial infarction). Increased apo-B (tertile 1 vs 3) levels were associated with a significant increased risk of CHD after adjustment for nonlipid and lipid risk factors other than LDL cholesterol levels (relative risk 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.31 to 2.73). High plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations (tertile 1 vs 3) were also associated with an increased risk of CHD independently of nonlipid and lipid risk factors (relative risk 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 2.84). However, apo-B levels modulated to a significant extent the risk of CHD associated with increased concentrations of LDL cholesterol (>/=4.3 mmol/L). For instance, among men with high LDL cholesterol levels, those with an apo-B level <128 mg/dl were not at increased risk for CHD (relative risk 1.53, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 2.62). In contrast, high levels of apo-B and LDL cholesterol were associated with a significant twofold increased risk of CHD (p <0.001). Receiver-operating curve analysis also indicated that plasma apo-B levels improved the ability to discriminate incident CHD cases among patients with high LDL cholesterol levels compared with a model based on LDL cholesterol levels (p = 0.04). In conclusion, plasma apo-B levels modulated the risk of CHD associated with LDL cholesterol over a 13-year follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute on Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16563904

Citation

St-Pierre, Annie C., et al. "Apolipoprotein-B, Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and the Long-term Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 97, no. 7, 2006, pp. 997-1001.
St-Pierre AC, Cantin B, Dagenais GR, et al. Apolipoprotein-B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the long-term risk of coronary heart disease in men. Am J Cardiol. 2006;97(7):997-1001.
St-Pierre, A. C., Cantin, B., Dagenais, G. R., Després, J. P., & Lamarche, B. (2006). Apolipoprotein-B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the long-term risk of coronary heart disease in men. The American Journal of Cardiology, 97(7), 997-1001.
St-Pierre AC, et al. Apolipoprotein-B, Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and the Long-term Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men. Am J Cardiol. 2006 Apr 1;97(7):997-1001. PubMed PMID: 16563904.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Apolipoprotein-B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the long-term risk of coronary heart disease in men. AU - St-Pierre,Annie C, AU - Cantin,Bernard, AU - Dagenais,Gilles R, AU - Després,Jean-Pierre, AU - Lamarche,Benoît, Y1 - 2006/02/13/ PY - 2005/03/16/received PY - 2005/10/31/revised PY - 2005/10/31/accepted PY - 2006/3/28/pubmed PY - 2006/5/5/medline PY - 2006/3/28/entrez SP - 997 EP - 1001 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 97 IS - 7 N2 - We examined whether plasma apolipoprotein-B (apo-B) levels add further information on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) after taking into account low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations and other traditional risk factors. Among 2,072 CHD-free men from the Québec Cardiovascular Study at entry and followed for 13 years, 230 had a first CHD event (CHD death or nonfatal myocardial infarction). Increased apo-B (tertile 1 vs 3) levels were associated with a significant increased risk of CHD after adjustment for nonlipid and lipid risk factors other than LDL cholesterol levels (relative risk 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.31 to 2.73). High plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations (tertile 1 vs 3) were also associated with an increased risk of CHD independently of nonlipid and lipid risk factors (relative risk 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 2.84). However, apo-B levels modulated to a significant extent the risk of CHD associated with increased concentrations of LDL cholesterol (>/=4.3 mmol/L). For instance, among men with high LDL cholesterol levels, those with an apo-B level <128 mg/dl were not at increased risk for CHD (relative risk 1.53, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 2.62). In contrast, high levels of apo-B and LDL cholesterol were associated with a significant twofold increased risk of CHD (p <0.001). Receiver-operating curve analysis also indicated that plasma apo-B levels improved the ability to discriminate incident CHD cases among patients with high LDL cholesterol levels compared with a model based on LDL cholesterol levels (p = 0.04). In conclusion, plasma apo-B levels modulated the risk of CHD associated with LDL cholesterol over a 13-year follow-up. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16563904/Apolipoprotein_B_low_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_and_the_long_term_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_in_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(06)00007-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -