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Does the content of primary care visits differ by the racial composition of physicians' practices?
Am J Med. 2006 Apr; 119(4):348-53.AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

The study compared the content of primary care visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices.

METHODS

We compared the content of primary care adult visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1997 to 2002. Larger African American practice (>14% of primary care visits by African Americans) was empirically defined to conform with previous studies.

RESULTS

Larger African American practices comprised 24% of all practices but accounted for 80% of all visits by African American patients. In adjusted analyses, physicians with larger African American practices were less likely to refer patients to specialists (adjusted odds ratio 0.77; 95% confidence internal 0.61-0.98) and marginally less likely to perform rectal examinations (adjusted odds ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.56-1.00) but were more likely to schedule a return appointment (adjusted odds ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.52). However, there were no other significant differences in the reported content of the office visits. Results were not altered when different cutoffs for larger African American practices were used or when obstetricians-gynecologists were excluded from the analyses.

CONCLUSION

There are few differences in the content of office visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA. Kevin_Fiscella@urmc.rochester.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16564778

Citation

Fiscella, Kevin, and Peter Franks. "Does the Content of Primary Care Visits Differ By the Racial Composition of Physicians' Practices?" The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 119, no. 4, 2006, pp. 348-53.
Fiscella K, Franks P. Does the content of primary care visits differ by the racial composition of physicians' practices? Am J Med. 2006;119(4):348-53.
Fiscella, K., & Franks, P. (2006). Does the content of primary care visits differ by the racial composition of physicians' practices? The American Journal of Medicine, 119(4), 348-53.
Fiscella K, Franks P. Does the Content of Primary Care Visits Differ By the Racial Composition of Physicians' Practices. Am J Med. 2006;119(4):348-53. PubMed PMID: 16564778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does the content of primary care visits differ by the racial composition of physicians' practices? AU - Fiscella,Kevin, AU - Franks,Peter, PY - 2005/08/14/received PY - 2005/08/26/revised PY - 2005/08/26/accepted PY - 2006/3/28/pubmed PY - 2006/4/11/medline PY - 2006/3/28/entrez SP - 348 EP - 53 JF - The American journal of medicine JO - Am J Med VL - 119 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The study compared the content of primary care visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices. METHODS: We compared the content of primary care adult visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1997 to 2002. Larger African American practice (>14% of primary care visits by African Americans) was empirically defined to conform with previous studies. RESULTS: Larger African American practices comprised 24% of all practices but accounted for 80% of all visits by African American patients. In adjusted analyses, physicians with larger African American practices were less likely to refer patients to specialists (adjusted odds ratio 0.77; 95% confidence internal 0.61-0.98) and marginally less likely to perform rectal examinations (adjusted odds ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.56-1.00) but were more likely to schedule a return appointment (adjusted odds ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.52). However, there were no other significant differences in the reported content of the office visits. Results were not altered when different cutoffs for larger African American practices were used or when obstetricians-gynecologists were excluded from the analyses. CONCLUSION: There are few differences in the content of office visits between physicians with larger and smaller African American practices. SN - 1555-7162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16564778/Does_the_content_of_primary_care_visits_differ_by_the_racial_composition_of_physicians'_practices L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9343(05)00784-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -