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Endothelial dysfunction in PCOS: role of obesity and adipose hormones.
Am J Med. 2006 Apr; 119(4):356.e1-6.AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an extremely prevalent disorder in which elevated blood markers of cardiovascular risk and altered endothelial function have been found. This study was designed to determine if abnormal carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in young women with PCOS may be explained by insulin resistance and elevated adipocytokines.

METHODS

A prospective study in 50 young women with PCOS (age: 25.2 +/- 1 years; body mass index [BMI]: 28.7 +/- 0.8) and 50 matched ovulatory controls (age: 25.1 +/- 0.7 years; BMI: 28.5 +/- 0.5) was performed. Carotid IMT, brachial FMD, and blood for fasting glucose, insulin, leptin, adiponectin and resistin were measured.

RESULTS

PCOS, IMT was increased (P <.01), FMD was decreased (P <.01), fasting insulin was increased (P <.01), QUICKI (a marker of insulin resistance) was decreased (P <.01), and adiponectin was lower (P <.05), whereas leptin and resistin were not different compared with matched controls. Whereas BMI or waist/hip ratios did not correlate with IMT or FMD, insulin and QUICKI correlated positively and negatively with IMT (P <.01). There was a significant negative correlation between adiponectin and IMT (P <.05). These correlations were unchanged when adjusting for BMI and the correlation between IMT and adiponectin was unaffected by insulin resistance parameters.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that young women with PCOS have evidence for altered endothelial function. Adverse endothelial parameters were correlated with insulin resistance and lower adiponectin. Both insulin resistance and adiponectin appear to be important parameters. It is hypothesized that the type of fat distribution may influence these factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Palermo, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16564785

Citation

Carmina, E, et al. "Endothelial Dysfunction in PCOS: Role of Obesity and Adipose Hormones." The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 119, no. 4, 2006, pp. 356.e1-6.
Carmina E, Orio F, Palomba S, et al. Endothelial dysfunction in PCOS: role of obesity and adipose hormones. Am J Med. 2006;119(4):356.e1-6.
Carmina, E., Orio, F., Palomba, S., Longo, R. A., Cascella, T., Colao, A., Lombardi, G., Rini, G. B., & Lobo, R. A. (2006). Endothelial dysfunction in PCOS: role of obesity and adipose hormones. The American Journal of Medicine, 119(4), e1-6.
Carmina E, et al. Endothelial Dysfunction in PCOS: Role of Obesity and Adipose Hormones. Am J Med. 2006;119(4):356.e1-6. PubMed PMID: 16564785.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endothelial dysfunction in PCOS: role of obesity and adipose hormones. AU - Carmina,E, AU - Orio,F, AU - Palomba,S, AU - Longo,R A, AU - Cascella,T, AU - Colao,A, AU - Lombardi,G, AU - Rini,G B, AU - Lobo,Rogerio A, PY - 2005/04/07/received PY - 2005/10/14/accepted PY - 2006/3/28/pubmed PY - 2006/4/11/medline PY - 2006/3/28/entrez SP - 356.e1 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of medicine JO - Am J Med VL - 119 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an extremely prevalent disorder in which elevated blood markers of cardiovascular risk and altered endothelial function have been found. This study was designed to determine if abnormal carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in young women with PCOS may be explained by insulin resistance and elevated adipocytokines. METHODS: A prospective study in 50 young women with PCOS (age: 25.2 +/- 1 years; body mass index [BMI]: 28.7 +/- 0.8) and 50 matched ovulatory controls (age: 25.1 +/- 0.7 years; BMI: 28.5 +/- 0.5) was performed. Carotid IMT, brachial FMD, and blood for fasting glucose, insulin, leptin, adiponectin and resistin were measured. RESULTS: PCOS, IMT was increased (P <.01), FMD was decreased (P <.01), fasting insulin was increased (P <.01), QUICKI (a marker of insulin resistance) was decreased (P <.01), and adiponectin was lower (P <.05), whereas leptin and resistin were not different compared with matched controls. Whereas BMI or waist/hip ratios did not correlate with IMT or FMD, insulin and QUICKI correlated positively and negatively with IMT (P <.01). There was a significant negative correlation between adiponectin and IMT (P <.05). These correlations were unchanged when adjusting for BMI and the correlation between IMT and adiponectin was unaffected by insulin resistance parameters. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that young women with PCOS have evidence for altered endothelial function. Adverse endothelial parameters were correlated with insulin resistance and lower adiponectin. Both insulin resistance and adiponectin appear to be important parameters. It is hypothesized that the type of fat distribution may influence these factors. SN - 1555-7162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16564785/Endothelial_dysfunction_in_PCOS:_role_of_obesity_and_adipose_hormones_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9343(05)01072-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -