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Obesity, disordered eating, and eating disorders in a longitudinal study of adolescents: how do dieters fare 5 years later?
J Am Diet Assoc 2006; 106(4):559-68JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if adolescents who report dieting and different weight-control behaviors are at increased or decreased risk for gains in body mass index, overweight status, binge eating, extreme weight-control behaviors, and eating disorders 5 years later.

DESIGN

Population-based 5-year longitudinal study.

PARTICIPANTS

Adolescents (N=2,516) from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds who completed Project EAT (Eating Among Teens) surveys in 1999 (Time 1) and 2004 (Time 2).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Weight status, binge eating, extreme weight control, and self-reported eating disorder.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Multiple linear and logistic regressions.

RESULTS

Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors at Time 1 increased their body mass index by about 1 unit more than adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors and were at approximately three times greater risk for being overweight at Time 2 (odds ratio [OR]=2.7 for girls; OR=3.2 for boys). Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors were also at increased risk for binge eating with loss of control (OR=6.4 for girls; OR=5.9 for boys) and for extreme weight-control behaviors such as self-induced vomiting and use of diet pills, laxatives, and diuretics (OR=2.5 for girls; OR=4.8 for boys) 5 years later, compared with adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS

Dieting and unhealthful weight-control behaviors predict outcomes related to obesity and eating disorders 5 years later. A shift away from dieting and drastic weight-control measures toward the long-term implementation of healthful eating and physical activity behaviors is needed to prevent obesity and eating disorders in adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 S Second Street, Ste 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. neumark@epi.umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16567152

Citation

Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne, et al. "Obesity, Disordered Eating, and Eating Disorders in a Longitudinal Study of Adolescents: How Do Dieters Fare 5 Years Later?" Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 106, no. 4, 2006, pp. 559-68.
Neumark-Sztainer D, Wall M, Guo J, et al. Obesity, disordered eating, and eating disorders in a longitudinal study of adolescents: how do dieters fare 5 years later? J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(4):559-68.
Neumark-Sztainer, D., Wall, M., Guo, J., Story, M., Haines, J., & Eisenberg, M. (2006). Obesity, disordered eating, and eating disorders in a longitudinal study of adolescents: how do dieters fare 5 years later? Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(4), pp. 559-68.
Neumark-Sztainer D, et al. Obesity, Disordered Eating, and Eating Disorders in a Longitudinal Study of Adolescents: How Do Dieters Fare 5 Years Later. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(4):559-68. PubMed PMID: 16567152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity, disordered eating, and eating disorders in a longitudinal study of adolescents: how do dieters fare 5 years later? AU - Neumark-Sztainer,Dianne, AU - Wall,Melanie, AU - Guo,Jia, AU - Story,Mary, AU - Haines,Jess, AU - Eisenberg,Marla, PY - 2005/04/11/received PY - 2006/3/29/pubmed PY - 2006/5/10/medline PY - 2006/3/29/entrez SP - 559 EP - 68 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 106 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if adolescents who report dieting and different weight-control behaviors are at increased or decreased risk for gains in body mass index, overweight status, binge eating, extreme weight-control behaviors, and eating disorders 5 years later. DESIGN: Population-based 5-year longitudinal study. PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents (N=2,516) from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds who completed Project EAT (Eating Among Teens) surveys in 1999 (Time 1) and 2004 (Time 2). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Weight status, binge eating, extreme weight control, and self-reported eating disorder. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Multiple linear and logistic regressions. RESULTS: Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors at Time 1 increased their body mass index by about 1 unit more than adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors and were at approximately three times greater risk for being overweight at Time 2 (odds ratio [OR]=2.7 for girls; OR=3.2 for boys). Adolescents using unhealthful weight-control behaviors were also at increased risk for binge eating with loss of control (OR=6.4 for girls; OR=5.9 for boys) and for extreme weight-control behaviors such as self-induced vomiting and use of diet pills, laxatives, and diuretics (OR=2.5 for girls; OR=4.8 for boys) 5 years later, compared with adolescents not using any weight-control behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Dieting and unhealthful weight-control behaviors predict outcomes related to obesity and eating disorders 5 years later. A shift away from dieting and drastic weight-control measures toward the long-term implementation of healthful eating and physical activity behaviors is needed to prevent obesity and eating disorders in adolescents. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16567152/Obesity_disordered_eating_and_eating_disorders_in_a_longitudinal_study_of_adolescents:_how_do_dieters_fare_5_years_later L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)00004-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -