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Intake of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish and incidence of atrial fibrillation. The Rotterdam Study.
Am Heart J 2006; 151(4):857-62AH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through an increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. Experimental as well as observational evidence suggests that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have antiarrhythmic effects. The objective of this study was to examine whether high intakes of fish and its very long-chain n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with risk of incident atrial fibrillation.

METHODS

We used data from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study. At baseline, dietary intake data were available for 5184 subjects free from atrial fibrillation. Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire, and incidence of atrial fibrillation was continuously monitored during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards model (adjusted for lifestyle and disease factors) was used to examine the associations between intakes of EPA plus DHA and of fish with atrial fibrillation.

RESULTS

After a mean follow-up of 6.4 (+/-1.6) years, 312 subjects developed atrial fibrillation. Intake of EPA and DHA in the third textile compared with first was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (relative risk 1.18, 95% CI 0.88-1.57). Furthermore, no association was observed with intake of >20 g/d fish compared with no fish intake (relative risk 1.17, 95% CI 0.87-1.57).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, intakes of EPA and DHA and the consumption of fish were not associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation. This finding does not support that n-3 fatty acids have a general antiarrhythmic effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, Wageningen, The Netherlands. ingeborg.brouwer@wur.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16569549

Citation

Brouwer, Ingeborg A., et al. "Intake of Very Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids From Fish and Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation. the Rotterdam Study." American Heart Journal, vol. 151, no. 4, 2006, pp. 857-62.
Brouwer IA, Heeringa J, Geleijnse JM, et al. Intake of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish and incidence of atrial fibrillation. The Rotterdam Study. Am Heart J. 2006;151(4):857-62.
Brouwer, I. A., Heeringa, J., Geleijnse, J. M., Zock, P. L., & Witteman, J. C. (2006). Intake of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish and incidence of atrial fibrillation. The Rotterdam Study. American Heart Journal, 151(4), pp. 857-62.
Brouwer IA, et al. Intake of Very Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids From Fish and Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation. the Rotterdam Study. Am Heart J. 2006;151(4):857-62. PubMed PMID: 16569549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of very long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish and incidence of atrial fibrillation. The Rotterdam Study. AU - Brouwer,Ingeborg A, AU - Heeringa,Jan, AU - Geleijnse,Johanna M, AU - Zock,Peter L, AU - Witteman,Jacqueline C M, PY - 2005/04/05/received PY - 2005/07/08/accepted PY - 2006/3/30/pubmed PY - 2006/4/25/medline PY - 2006/3/30/entrez SP - 857 EP - 62 JF - American heart journal JO - Am. Heart J. VL - 151 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through an increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. Experimental as well as observational evidence suggests that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have antiarrhythmic effects. The objective of this study was to examine whether high intakes of fish and its very long-chain n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with risk of incident atrial fibrillation. METHODS: We used data from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study. At baseline, dietary intake data were available for 5184 subjects free from atrial fibrillation. Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire, and incidence of atrial fibrillation was continuously monitored during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards model (adjusted for lifestyle and disease factors) was used to examine the associations between intakes of EPA plus DHA and of fish with atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 6.4 (+/-1.6) years, 312 subjects developed atrial fibrillation. Intake of EPA and DHA in the third textile compared with first was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (relative risk 1.18, 95% CI 0.88-1.57). Furthermore, no association was observed with intake of >20 g/d fish compared with no fish intake (relative risk 1.17, 95% CI 0.87-1.57). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, intakes of EPA and DHA and the consumption of fish were not associated with the onset of atrial fibrillation. This finding does not support that n-3 fatty acids have a general antiarrhythmic effect. SN - 1097-6744 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16569549/Intake_of_very_long_chain_n_3_fatty_acids_from_fish_and_incidence_of_atrial_fibrillation__The_Rotterdam_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8703(05)00757-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -