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Contribution of CB1 blockade to the management of high-risk abdominal obesity.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr; 30 Suppl 1:S44-52.IJ

Abstract

The worldwide increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes represents a tremendous challenge for our healthcare system, especially if we consider that this phenomenon is largely explained by the epidemic of obesity. However, despite the well-recognized increased morbidity and mortality associated with an elevated body weight, there is now more and more evidence highlighting that abdominal adipose tissue is the fat depot that conveys the greatest risk of metabolic complications. This cluster of metabolic abnormalities has been referred to as the metabolic syndrome and this condition is largely the consequence of abdominal obesity, especially when accompanied by a high accumulation of visceral adipose tissue. This cluster of metabolic complications has also been found to be predictive of a substantially increased risk of coronary heart disease beyond the presence of traditional risk factors. Moreover, a moderate weight loss in initially abdominally obese patients is associated with a selective mobilization of visceral adipose tissue, leading to improvements in the metabolic risk profile predictive of a reduced risk of coronary heart disease and of type 2 diabetes. The recent discovery of the endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor system and of its impact on the regulation of energy metabolism represents a significant advance, which will help physicians target abdominal obesity and its related metabolic complications. In this regard, studies have shown that rimonabant therapy (the first developed CB1 blocker) could be useful for the management of clustering cardiovascular disease risk factors in high-risk abdominally obese patients through its effects not only on energy balance but also on adipose tissue metabolism. For instance, the presence of CB1 receptors in adipose tissue and the recently reported effect of rimonabant on adiponectin production by adipose cells may represent a key factor responsible for the weight loss-independent effect of this CB1 blocker on cardiometabolic risk variables.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Québec Heart Institute, Hôpital Laval Research Center, Québec, Québec, Canada. jean-pierre.despres@crhl.ulaval.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16570106

Citation

Després, J-P, et al. "Contribution of CB1 Blockade to the Management of High-risk Abdominal Obesity." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 30 Suppl 1, 2006, pp. S44-52.
Després JP, Lemieux I, Alméras N. Contribution of CB1 blockade to the management of high-risk abdominal obesity. Int J Obes (Lond). 2006;30 Suppl 1:S44-52.
Després, J. P., Lemieux, I., & Alméras, N. (2006). Contribution of CB1 blockade to the management of high-risk abdominal obesity. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 30 Suppl 1, S44-52.
Després JP, Lemieux I, Alméras N. Contribution of CB1 Blockade to the Management of High-risk Abdominal Obesity. Int J Obes (Lond). 2006;30 Suppl 1:S44-52. PubMed PMID: 16570106.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of CB1 blockade to the management of high-risk abdominal obesity. AU - Després,J-P, AU - Lemieux,I, AU - Alméras,N, PY - 2006/3/30/pubmed PY - 2006/8/9/medline PY - 2006/3/30/entrez SP - S44 EP - 52 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 30 Suppl 1 N2 - The worldwide increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes represents a tremendous challenge for our healthcare system, especially if we consider that this phenomenon is largely explained by the epidemic of obesity. However, despite the well-recognized increased morbidity and mortality associated with an elevated body weight, there is now more and more evidence highlighting that abdominal adipose tissue is the fat depot that conveys the greatest risk of metabolic complications. This cluster of metabolic abnormalities has been referred to as the metabolic syndrome and this condition is largely the consequence of abdominal obesity, especially when accompanied by a high accumulation of visceral adipose tissue. This cluster of metabolic complications has also been found to be predictive of a substantially increased risk of coronary heart disease beyond the presence of traditional risk factors. Moreover, a moderate weight loss in initially abdominally obese patients is associated with a selective mobilization of visceral adipose tissue, leading to improvements in the metabolic risk profile predictive of a reduced risk of coronary heart disease and of type 2 diabetes. The recent discovery of the endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor system and of its impact on the regulation of energy metabolism represents a significant advance, which will help physicians target abdominal obesity and its related metabolic complications. In this regard, studies have shown that rimonabant therapy (the first developed CB1 blocker) could be useful for the management of clustering cardiovascular disease risk factors in high-risk abdominally obese patients through its effects not only on energy balance but also on adipose tissue metabolism. For instance, the presence of CB1 receptors in adipose tissue and the recently reported effect of rimonabant on adiponectin production by adipose cells may represent a key factor responsible for the weight loss-independent effect of this CB1 blocker on cardiometabolic risk variables. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16570106/Contribution_of_CB1_blockade_to_the_management_of_high_risk_abdominal_obesity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803278 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -