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From Ars to Scientia: the revolution of anatomic illustration.
Clin Anat. 2006 May; 19(4):382-8.CA

Abstract

Art and anatomy have been closely related since the Renaissance, when artists studied the human body to gain more perfect perspectives, and anatomists began illustrating their texts. As the two fields became increasingly intertwined, the distinctions between artistic drawings and scientific illustrations of the human body's form and function became increasingly blurred. Early Renaissance anatomists were more artistic than scientific with their images, but Hieronymus Fabricius ab Acquapendente (1533-1619) provided a crucial turning point in the evolution of anatomic illustration. His new and strict focus upon scientific illustration developed in the context of previous anatomists' work and theories, but his is a critical and previously untold story in the history of medicine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. smith.sean@mayo.edu

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16570293

Citation

Smith, Sean B.. "From Ars to Scientia: the Revolution of Anatomic Illustration." Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), vol. 19, no. 4, 2006, pp. 382-8.
Smith SB. From Ars to Scientia: the revolution of anatomic illustration. Clin Anat. 2006;19(4):382-8.
Smith, S. B. (2006). From Ars to Scientia: the revolution of anatomic illustration. Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), 19(4), 382-8.
Smith SB. From Ars to Scientia: the Revolution of Anatomic Illustration. Clin Anat. 2006;19(4):382-8. PubMed PMID: 16570293.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - From Ars to Scientia: the revolution of anatomic illustration. A1 - Smith,Sean B, PY - 2006/3/30/pubmed PY - 2007/7/13/medline PY - 2006/3/30/entrez SP - 382 EP - 8 JF - Clinical anatomy (New York, N.Y.) JO - Clin Anat VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - Art and anatomy have been closely related since the Renaissance, when artists studied the human body to gain more perfect perspectives, and anatomists began illustrating their texts. As the two fields became increasingly intertwined, the distinctions between artistic drawings and scientific illustrations of the human body's form and function became increasingly blurred. Early Renaissance anatomists were more artistic than scientific with their images, but Hieronymus Fabricius ab Acquapendente (1533-1619) provided a crucial turning point in the evolution of anatomic illustration. His new and strict focus upon scientific illustration developed in the context of previous anatomists' work and theories, but his is a critical and previously untold story in the history of medicine. SN - 0897-3806 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16570293/From_Ars_to_Scientia:_the_revolution_of_anatomic_illustration_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.20307 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -