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Relationship of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity in humans, independent of lipid availability.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test in humans the hypothesis that part of the association of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid availability.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

We studied relationships among plasma adiponectin, insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), total adiposity (by DXA), visceral adiposity (VAT; by magnetic resonance imaging), and indices of lipid available to muscle, including circulating and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL; by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Our cohort included normal weight to obese men (n = 36).

RESULTS

Plasma adiponectin was directly associated with insulin sensitivity and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and inversely with plasma triglycerides but not IMCL. These findings are consistent with adiponectin promoting lipid uptake and subsequent oxidation in muscle and inhibiting TG synthesis in the liver. In multiple regression models that also included visceral and total fat, free fatty acids, TGs, and IMCL, either alone or in combination, adiponectin independently predicted insulin sensitivity, consistent with some of its insulin-sensitizing effects being mediated through mechanisms other than modulation of lipid metabolism. Because VAT directly correlated with total fat and all three indices of local lipid availability, free fatty acids, and IMCL, an efficient regression model of insulin sensitivity (R2 = 0.69, p < 0.0001) contained only VAT (part R2 = 0.12, p < 0.002) and adiponectin (part R2 = 0.41, p < 0.0001) as independent variables.

DISCUSSION

Given the broad range of total adiposity and body fat distribution in our cohort, we suggest that insulin sensitivity is robustly associated with adiponectin and VAT.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Diabetes and Obesity Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. s.furler@garvan.org.au

    , , , ,

    Source

    Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 14:2 2006 Feb pg 228-34

    MeSH

    Adiponectin
    Adipose Tissue
    Adult
    Body Composition
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cohort Studies
    Glucose Clamp Technique
    Humans
    Insulin
    Insulin Resistance
    Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
    Intra-Abdominal Fat
    Lipid Metabolism
    Liver
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
    Male
    Muscle, Skeletal
    Obesity
    Triglycerides

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16571847

    Citation

    Furler, Stuart M., et al. "Relationship of Adiponectin With Insulin Sensitivity in Humans, Independent of Lipid Availability." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 14, no. 2, 2006, pp. 228-34.
    Furler SM, Gan SK, Poynten AM, et al. Relationship of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity in humans, independent of lipid availability. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(2):228-34.
    Furler, S. M., Gan, S. K., Poynten, A. M., Chisholm, D. J., Campbell, L. V., & Kriketos, A. D. (2006). Relationship of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity in humans, independent of lipid availability. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 14(2), pp. 228-34.
    Furler SM, et al. Relationship of Adiponectin With Insulin Sensitivity in Humans, Independent of Lipid Availability. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(2):228-34. PubMed PMID: 16571847.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity in humans, independent of lipid availability. AU - Furler,Stuart M, AU - Gan,Seng Khee, AU - Poynten,Ann M, AU - Chisholm,Donald J, AU - Campbell,Lesley V, AU - Kriketos,Adamandia D, PY - 2006/3/31/pubmed PY - 2006/9/6/medline PY - 2006/3/31/entrez SP - 228 EP - 34 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test in humans the hypothesis that part of the association of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid availability. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We studied relationships among plasma adiponectin, insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), total adiposity (by DXA), visceral adiposity (VAT; by magnetic resonance imaging), and indices of lipid available to muscle, including circulating and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL; by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Our cohort included normal weight to obese men (n = 36). RESULTS: Plasma adiponectin was directly associated with insulin sensitivity and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and inversely with plasma triglycerides but not IMCL. These findings are consistent with adiponectin promoting lipid uptake and subsequent oxidation in muscle and inhibiting TG synthesis in the liver. In multiple regression models that also included visceral and total fat, free fatty acids, TGs, and IMCL, either alone or in combination, adiponectin independently predicted insulin sensitivity, consistent with some of its insulin-sensitizing effects being mediated through mechanisms other than modulation of lipid metabolism. Because VAT directly correlated with total fat and all three indices of local lipid availability, free fatty acids, and IMCL, an efficient regression model of insulin sensitivity (R2 = 0.69, p < 0.0001) contained only VAT (part R2 = 0.12, p < 0.002) and adiponectin (part R2 = 0.41, p < 0.0001) as independent variables. DISCUSSION: Given the broad range of total adiposity and body fat distribution in our cohort, we suggest that insulin sensitivity is robustly associated with adiponectin and VAT. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16571847/Relationship_of_adiponectin_with_insulin_sensitivity_in_humans_independent_of_lipid_availability_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.29 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -