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Relationship between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer.
Nutr Cancer 2005; 53(2):127-34NC

Abstract

Carotenoids, particularly lycopene, are thought to decrease prostate cancer risk, but the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentrations and risk in various populations has not been well characterized. Comparing 118 non-Hispanic Caucasian men mainly from southeast Texas with nonmetastatic prostate cancer with 52 healthy men from the same area, we conducted a case-control analysis evaluating associations between risk and plasma levels of total carotenoids, beta-cryptoxanthin, alpha- and trans-beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, total lycopenes, trans-lycopene, total cis-lycopenes, and cis-lycopene isoforms 1, 2, 3, and 5. Risk for men with high plasma levels of alpha-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lutein and zeaxanthin was less than half that for those with lower levels. In contrast, we observed no significant associations for total lycopenes, all-trans-lycopene, and cis-lycopene isomer peaks 2, 3, and 5, although high levels of cis-lycopene isomer peak 1 were inversely associated with risk. Analysis of men with aggressive disease (Gleason scores of > or =7, n = 88) vs. less aggressive cases (Gleason scores of <7, n = 30) failed to reveal significant associations between carotenoid levels and the risk of diagnosis with aggressive disease. These findings suggest that, in these men, higher circulating levels of alpha-cryptoxanthin, alpha-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and lutein and zeaxanthin may contribute to lower prostate cancer risk but not to disease progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. shinechang@MDAnderson.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16573373

Citation

Chang, Shine, et al. "Relationship Between Plasma Carotenoids and Prostate Cancer." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 53, no. 2, 2005, pp. 127-34.
Chang S, Erdman JW, Clinton SK, et al. Relationship between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2005;53(2):127-34.
Chang, S., Erdman, J. W., Clinton, S. K., Vadiveloo, M., Strom, S. S., Yamamura, Y., ... Hursting, S. D. (2005). Relationship between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer. Nutrition and Cancer, 53(2), pp. 127-34.
Chang S, et al. Relationship Between Plasma Carotenoids and Prostate Cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2005;53(2):127-34. PubMed PMID: 16573373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between plasma carotenoids and prostate cancer. AU - Chang,Shine, AU - Erdman,John W,Jr AU - Clinton,Steven K, AU - Vadiveloo,Maya, AU - Strom,Sara S, AU - Yamamura,Yuko, AU - Duphorne,Cherie M, AU - Spitz,Margaret R, AU - Amos,Christopher I, AU - Contois,John H, AU - Gu,Xiangjun, AU - Babaian,Richard J, AU - Scardino,Peter T, AU - Hursting,Stephen D, PY - 2006/4/1/pubmed PY - 2006/8/15/medline PY - 2006/4/1/entrez SP - 127 EP - 34 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Carotenoids, particularly lycopene, are thought to decrease prostate cancer risk, but the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentrations and risk in various populations has not been well characterized. Comparing 118 non-Hispanic Caucasian men mainly from southeast Texas with nonmetastatic prostate cancer with 52 healthy men from the same area, we conducted a case-control analysis evaluating associations between risk and plasma levels of total carotenoids, beta-cryptoxanthin, alpha- and trans-beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, total lycopenes, trans-lycopene, total cis-lycopenes, and cis-lycopene isoforms 1, 2, 3, and 5. Risk for men with high plasma levels of alpha-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lutein and zeaxanthin was less than half that for those with lower levels. In contrast, we observed no significant associations for total lycopenes, all-trans-lycopene, and cis-lycopene isomer peaks 2, 3, and 5, although high levels of cis-lycopene isomer peak 1 were inversely associated with risk. Analysis of men with aggressive disease (Gleason scores of > or =7, n = 88) vs. less aggressive cases (Gleason scores of <7, n = 30) failed to reveal significant associations between carotenoid levels and the risk of diagnosis with aggressive disease. These findings suggest that, in these men, higher circulating levels of alpha-cryptoxanthin, alpha-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and lutein and zeaxanthin may contribute to lower prostate cancer risk but not to disease progression. SN - 0163-5581 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16573373/Relationship_between_plasma_carotenoids_and_prostate_cancer_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1207/s15327914nc5302_1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -