Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Arab and Jewish elementary school students' perceptions of fear and school violence: understanding the influence of school context.
Br J Educ Psychol. 2006 Mar; 76(Pt 1):91-118.BJ

Abstract

This inquiry explores variables that predict elementary school students' fear of attending school due to school violence and their overall judgments of school violence as a problem. Using a nationally representative sample (Israel) of 5,472 elementary-school-aged children, this study tested the hypotheses that: (a) young students' personal fear of attending school due to violence, and (b) students' assessment of a school violence problem, are best understood as separate conceptual constructs. Structural equation modelling was used to test the proposed theoretical model for the sample as a whole and separately for across gender and for Arab and Jewish students. Student fear of attending school due to violence was related directly to experiences of personal victimization on school grounds by students and teachers. Children's judgments of their schools' overall violence problem were influenced directly by the school climate, risky peer-group behaviours, and personal victimization. The findings provide evidence that the proposed theoretical model applies across gender groups and for both Arab and Jewish students. Implications for policy, theory, and future research are highlighted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Education, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90089-0411, USA. rastor@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16573981

Citation

Astor, Ron Avi, et al. "Arab and Jewish Elementary School Students' Perceptions of Fear and School Violence: Understanding the Influence of School Context." The British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 76, no. Pt 1, 2006, pp. 91-118.
Astor RA, Benbenishty R, Vinokur AD, et al. Arab and Jewish elementary school students' perceptions of fear and school violence: understanding the influence of school context. Br J Educ Psychol. 2006;76(Pt 1):91-118.
Astor, R. A., Benbenishty, R., Vinokur, A. D., & Zeira, A. (2006). Arab and Jewish elementary school students' perceptions of fear and school violence: understanding the influence of school context. The British Journal of Educational Psychology, 76(Pt 1), 91-118.
Astor RA, et al. Arab and Jewish Elementary School Students' Perceptions of Fear and School Violence: Understanding the Influence of School Context. Br J Educ Psychol. 2006;76(Pt 1):91-118. PubMed PMID: 16573981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arab and Jewish elementary school students' perceptions of fear and school violence: understanding the influence of school context. AU - Astor,Ron Avi, AU - Benbenishty,Rami, AU - Vinokur,Amiram D, AU - Zeira,Anat, PY - 2006/4/1/pubmed PY - 2006/5/12/medline PY - 2006/4/1/entrez SP - 91 EP - 118 JF - The British journal of educational psychology JO - Br J Educ Psychol VL - 76 IS - Pt 1 N2 - This inquiry explores variables that predict elementary school students' fear of attending school due to school violence and their overall judgments of school violence as a problem. Using a nationally representative sample (Israel) of 5,472 elementary-school-aged children, this study tested the hypotheses that: (a) young students' personal fear of attending school due to violence, and (b) students' assessment of a school violence problem, are best understood as separate conceptual constructs. Structural equation modelling was used to test the proposed theoretical model for the sample as a whole and separately for across gender and for Arab and Jewish students. Student fear of attending school due to violence was related directly to experiences of personal victimization on school grounds by students and teachers. Children's judgments of their schools' overall violence problem were influenced directly by the school climate, risky peer-group behaviours, and personal victimization. The findings provide evidence that the proposed theoretical model applies across gender groups and for both Arab and Jewish students. Implications for policy, theory, and future research are highlighted. SN - 0007-0998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16573981/Arab_and_Jewish_elementary_school_students'_perceptions_of_fear_and_school_violence:_understanding_the_influence_of_school_context_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1348/000709905X37307 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -