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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship to white blood cell count in a population of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations.
Am J Hypertens 2006; 19(4):339-45AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Limited information is available about the prevalence of MetS among Thai men and women. In this study we sought to estimate the prevalence of MetS among a population of patients receiving annual health exams. We also studied the relationship between MetS and elevated white blood cell (WBC) count.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study of 1,383 patients (375 men and 1,008 women) who participated in annual health examinations at the Preventive Medicine Clinic of the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, from July 1999 through February 2000. The presence of MetS was defined using the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.

RESULTS

Overall, the prevalence of the MetS was 12.8% and was more common among men than women (15.7% v 11.7%). Advanced age and elevated WBC counts were the only statistically significant risk factors of MetS in this population. The WBC count was statistically significantly correlated with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride (P = .05). Men with highest WBC count (>or=7.50 x 10(3) cell/microL) had a 2.98-fold increased in risk of MetS (odds ratio 2.98, 95% confidence interval 1.29 to 6.87), as compared with men in the lowest quartile (<5.40 x 10(3) cell/microL). Among women, the risk of MetS increased across successive quartiles of WBC counts (1.00, 2.26, 2.88, and 4.30, with the lowest quartile as the referent group).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations, MetS was found to be prevalent. In addition, WBC count (indicative of systemic chronic inflammation) is positively associated with MetS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. vitool@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16580566

Citation

Lohsoonthorn, Vitool, et al. "Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Relationship to White Blood Cell Count in a Population of Thai Men and Women Receiving Routine Health Examinations." American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 19, no. 4, 2006, pp. 339-45.
Lohsoonthorn V, Dhanamun B, Williams MA. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship to white blood cell count in a population of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations. Am J Hypertens. 2006;19(4):339-45.
Lohsoonthorn, V., Dhanamun, B., & Williams, M. A. (2006). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship to white blood cell count in a population of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations. American Journal of Hypertension, 19(4), pp. 339-45.
Lohsoonthorn V, Dhanamun B, Williams MA. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Relationship to White Blood Cell Count in a Population of Thai Men and Women Receiving Routine Health Examinations. Am J Hypertens. 2006;19(4):339-45. PubMed PMID: 16580566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship to white blood cell count in a population of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations. AU - Lohsoonthorn,Vitool, AU - Dhanamun,Bodi, AU - Williams,Michelle A, PY - 2005/08/27/received PY - 2005/10/17/revised PY - 2005/10/26/accepted PY - 2006/4/4/pubmed PY - 2006/8/23/medline PY - 2006/4/4/entrez SP - 339 EP - 45 JF - American journal of hypertension JO - Am. J. Hypertens. VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Limited information is available about the prevalence of MetS among Thai men and women. In this study we sought to estimate the prevalence of MetS among a population of patients receiving annual health exams. We also studied the relationship between MetS and elevated white blood cell (WBC) count. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1,383 patients (375 men and 1,008 women) who participated in annual health examinations at the Preventive Medicine Clinic of the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, from July 1999 through February 2000. The presence of MetS was defined using the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. RESULTS: Overall, the prevalence of the MetS was 12.8% and was more common among men than women (15.7% v 11.7%). Advanced age and elevated WBC counts were the only statistically significant risk factors of MetS in this population. The WBC count was statistically significantly correlated with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride (P = .05). Men with highest WBC count (>or=7.50 x 10(3) cell/microL) had a 2.98-fold increased in risk of MetS (odds ratio 2.98, 95% confidence interval 1.29 to 6.87), as compared with men in the lowest quartile (<5.40 x 10(3) cell/microL). Among women, the risk of MetS increased across successive quartiles of WBC counts (1.00, 2.26, 2.88, and 4.30, with the lowest quartile as the referent group). CONCLUSIONS: In this study of Thai men and women receiving routine health examinations, MetS was found to be prevalent. In addition, WBC count (indicative of systemic chronic inflammation) is positively associated with MetS. SN - 0895-7061 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16580566/Prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_and_its_relationship_to_white_blood_cell_count_in_a_population_of_Thai_men_and_women_receiving_routine_health_examinations_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajh/article-lookup/doi/10.1016/j.amjhyper.2005.10.008 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -