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How do psychological factors influence adolescent smoking progression? The evidence for indirect effects through tobacco advertising receptivity.
Pediatrics. 2006 Apr; 117(4):1216-25.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether novelty seeking and depressive symptoms had mediated or indirect effects on adolescent smoking progression through tobacco advertising receptivity.

METHODS

More than 1000 adolescents were monitored from 9th grade to 12th grade and completed annual surveys that measured demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, tobacco advertising receptivity, novelty-seeking personality, depressive symptoms, family and peer smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use.

RESULTS

Latent growth modeling indicated that novelty seeking had a significant indirect effect on smoking progression through baseline tobacco advertising receptivity. For each 1-SD increase in novelty seeking, the odds of being more receptive to tobacco advertising increased by 12% (ie, being in a specific category or higher), which in turn resulted in an 11% increase in the odds of smoking progression from 9th grade to 12th grade. The indirect effect from depressive symptoms to smoking progression did not reach significance.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings may inform future research on other factors that influence tobacco advertising receptivity, as well as programs aimed at preventing adolescent smoking initiation and progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. audrain@mail.med.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16585318

Citation

Audrain-McGovern, Janet, et al. "How Do Psychological Factors Influence Adolescent Smoking Progression? the Evidence for Indirect Effects Through Tobacco Advertising Receptivity." Pediatrics, vol. 117, no. 4, 2006, pp. 1216-25.
Audrain-McGovern J, Rodriguez D, Patel V, et al. How do psychological factors influence adolescent smoking progression? The evidence for indirect effects through tobacco advertising receptivity. Pediatrics. 2006;117(4):1216-25.
Audrain-McGovern, J., Rodriguez, D., Patel, V., Faith, M. S., Rodgers, K., & Cuevas, J. (2006). How do psychological factors influence adolescent smoking progression? The evidence for indirect effects through tobacco advertising receptivity. Pediatrics, 117(4), 1216-25.
Audrain-McGovern J, et al. How Do Psychological Factors Influence Adolescent Smoking Progression? the Evidence for Indirect Effects Through Tobacco Advertising Receptivity. Pediatrics. 2006;117(4):1216-25. PubMed PMID: 16585318.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How do psychological factors influence adolescent smoking progression? The evidence for indirect effects through tobacco advertising receptivity. AU - Audrain-McGovern,Janet, AU - Rodriguez,Daniel, AU - Patel,Vaishali, AU - Faith,Myles S, AU - Rodgers,Kelli, AU - Cuevas,Jocelyn, PY - 2006/4/6/pubmed PY - 2006/5/11/medline PY - 2006/4/6/entrez SP - 1216 EP - 25 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 117 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine whether novelty seeking and depressive symptoms had mediated or indirect effects on adolescent smoking progression through tobacco advertising receptivity. METHODS: More than 1000 adolescents were monitored from 9th grade to 12th grade and completed annual surveys that measured demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, tobacco advertising receptivity, novelty-seeking personality, depressive symptoms, family and peer smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use. RESULTS: Latent growth modeling indicated that novelty seeking had a significant indirect effect on smoking progression through baseline tobacco advertising receptivity. For each 1-SD increase in novelty seeking, the odds of being more receptive to tobacco advertising increased by 12% (ie, being in a specific category or higher), which in turn resulted in an 11% increase in the odds of smoking progression from 9th grade to 12th grade. The indirect effect from depressive symptoms to smoking progression did not reach significance. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may inform future research on other factors that influence tobacco advertising receptivity, as well as programs aimed at preventing adolescent smoking initiation and progression. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16585318/How_do_psychological_factors_influence_adolescent_smoking_progression_The_evidence_for_indirect_effects_through_tobacco_advertising_receptivity_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16585318 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -