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Consumption of alcoholic beverages and risk of lung cancer: results from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada.
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 May; 17(4):469-80.CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association between consumption of alcoholic beverages and lung cancer risk.

METHODS

Data were collected in two population-based case-control studies, conducted in Montreal (Study I--mid-1980s and Study II--mid-1990s). Study I included 699 cases and 507 controls, all males; Study II included 1094 cases and 1468 controls, males and females. In each study group (Study I men, Study II men and Study II women) odds ratios (OR) were estimated for the associations between beer, wine or spirits consumption and lung cancer, while carefully adjusting for smoking and other covariates. The reference category included abstainers and occasional drinkers.

RESULTS

For Study I men, lung cancer risk increased with the average number of beers/week consumed (for 1-6 beers/week: OR=1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9-1.7; for >or=7 beers/week: OR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). For Study II men, beer consumption appeared harmful only among subjects with low fruit and vegetable consumption. In Study II, wine consumers had low lung cancer risk, particularly those reporting 1-6 glasses/week (women: OR=0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.4; men: OR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.8).

CONCLUSIONS

Beer consumption increased lung cancer risk, particularly so among men who had relatively low fruit and vegetable consumption. Moderate wine drinkers had decreased lung cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Montreal, Canada. andrea.benedetti@mail.mcgill.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16596299

Citation

Benedetti, Andrea, et al. "Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and Risk of Lung Cancer: Results From Two Case-control Studies in Montreal, Canada." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 17, no. 4, 2006, pp. 469-80.
Benedetti A, Parent ME, Siemiatycki J. Consumption of alcoholic beverages and risk of lung cancer: results from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(4):469-80.
Benedetti, A., Parent, M. E., & Siemiatycki, J. (2006). Consumption of alcoholic beverages and risk of lung cancer: results from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 17(4), 469-80.
Benedetti A, Parent ME, Siemiatycki J. Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and Risk of Lung Cancer: Results From Two Case-control Studies in Montreal, Canada. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(4):469-80. PubMed PMID: 16596299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of alcoholic beverages and risk of lung cancer: results from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada. AU - Benedetti,Andrea, AU - Parent,Marie-Elise, AU - Siemiatycki,Jack, PY - 2005/07/22/received PY - 2005/11/30/accepted PY - 2006/4/6/pubmed PY - 2006/10/28/medline PY - 2006/4/6/entrez SP - 469 EP - 80 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between consumption of alcoholic beverages and lung cancer risk. METHODS: Data were collected in two population-based case-control studies, conducted in Montreal (Study I--mid-1980s and Study II--mid-1990s). Study I included 699 cases and 507 controls, all males; Study II included 1094 cases and 1468 controls, males and females. In each study group (Study I men, Study II men and Study II women) odds ratios (OR) were estimated for the associations between beer, wine or spirits consumption and lung cancer, while carefully adjusting for smoking and other covariates. The reference category included abstainers and occasional drinkers. RESULTS: For Study I men, lung cancer risk increased with the average number of beers/week consumed (for 1-6 beers/week: OR=1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9-1.7; for >or=7 beers/week: OR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). For Study II men, beer consumption appeared harmful only among subjects with low fruit and vegetable consumption. In Study II, wine consumers had low lung cancer risk, particularly those reporting 1-6 glasses/week (women: OR=0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.4; men: OR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.8). CONCLUSIONS: Beer consumption increased lung cancer risk, particularly so among men who had relatively low fruit and vegetable consumption. Moderate wine drinkers had decreased lung cancer risk. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16596299/Consumption_of_alcoholic_beverages_and_risk_of_lung_cancer:_results_from_two_case_control_studies_in_Montreal_Canada_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-005-0496-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -