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Hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, there is not a previous description concerning their potential interaction; thus, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS), hypomagnesemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

METHODS

Case-control design study. Incident cases of MetS (84 women and 63 men) were compared with healthy control subjects (163 women and 131 men) matched by age and gender. MetS was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criterion. Oxidative stress was defined by serum malondialdehyde concentration (MDA) > or =50 mg/dL, low-grade chronic inflammation by C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels > or =3 mg/L, and hypomagnesemia by serum magnesium concentrations < or =1.8 mg/dL.

RESULTS

Multivariate analysis adjusted by age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and total adiposity showed a strong association between MetS and hypomagnesemia (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3-7.1), inflammation (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4-8.4), and oxidative stress (OR 1.4; 95% CI 0.9-12.6). Additional adjustment by CRP levels showed that MetS remained associated to hypomagnesemia (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-5.9) but not to oxidative stress (OR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-5.9), and adjusted by MDA levels, MetS remained strongly associated to hypomagnesemia (1.6; CI 95% 1.1-7.4), but not to inflammation (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.97-14.2). Adjusted by serum magnesium levels, inflammation (OR 1.2; 95% CI 1.1-9.1) and oxidative stress (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.1-9.7) were slightly associated to MetS.

CONCLUSIONS

The interaction of inflammation and oxidative stress is related and increases the risk for MetS, whereas serum magnesium levels and MetS are independently associated.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Medical Research Unit in Clinical Epidemiology, Mexican Social Security Institute, Research Group on Diabetes and Chronic Illnesses, Siqueiros 225 esq./Castañeda, 34000 Durango, Mexico. guerrero_romero@hotmail.com

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    C-Reactive Protein
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Inflammation
    Logistic Models
    Magnesium
    Male
    Malondialdehyde
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Oxidative Stress
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16598698

    Citation

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando, and Martha Rodríguez-Morán. "Hypomagnesemia, Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Metabolic Syndrome." Diabetes/metabolism Research and Reviews, vol. 22, no. 6, 2006, pp. 471-6.
    Guerrero-Romero F, Rodríguez-Morán M. Hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2006;22(6):471-6.
    Guerrero-Romero, F., & Rodríguez-Morán, M. (2006). Hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome. Diabetes/metabolism Research and Reviews, 22(6), pp. 471-6.
    Guerrero-Romero F, Rodríguez-Morán M. Hypomagnesemia, Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Metabolic Syndrome. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2006;22(6):471-6. PubMed PMID: 16598698.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome. AU - Guerrero-Romero,Fernando, AU - Rodríguez-Morán,Martha, PY - 2006/4/7/pubmed PY - 2006/12/19/medline PY - 2006/4/7/entrez SP - 471 EP - 6 JF - Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews JO - Diabetes Metab. Res. Rev. VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, there is not a previous description concerning their potential interaction; thus, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS), hypomagnesemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress. METHODS: Case-control design study. Incident cases of MetS (84 women and 63 men) were compared with healthy control subjects (163 women and 131 men) matched by age and gender. MetS was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criterion. Oxidative stress was defined by serum malondialdehyde concentration (MDA) > or =50 mg/dL, low-grade chronic inflammation by C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels > or =3 mg/L, and hypomagnesemia by serum magnesium concentrations < or =1.8 mg/dL. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis adjusted by age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and total adiposity showed a strong association between MetS and hypomagnesemia (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3-7.1), inflammation (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4-8.4), and oxidative stress (OR 1.4; 95% CI 0.9-12.6). Additional adjustment by CRP levels showed that MetS remained associated to hypomagnesemia (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-5.9) but not to oxidative stress (OR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-5.9), and adjusted by MDA levels, MetS remained strongly associated to hypomagnesemia (1.6; CI 95% 1.1-7.4), but not to inflammation (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.97-14.2). Adjusted by serum magnesium levels, inflammation (OR 1.2; 95% CI 1.1-9.1) and oxidative stress (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.1-9.7) were slightly associated to MetS. CONCLUSIONS: The interaction of inflammation and oxidative stress is related and increases the risk for MetS, whereas serum magnesium levels and MetS are independently associated. SN - 1520-7552 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16598698/Hypomagnesemia_oxidative_stress_inflammation_and_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.644 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -