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Randomized, controlled, crossover trial of oat bran in hypercholesterolemic subjects.
J Fam Pract. 1991 Dec; 33(6):600-8.JF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite animal and metabolic ward studies that support the benefit of oat bran as a useful dietary supplement for the lowering of cholesterol, there have been few controlled studies on free-living subjects that have convincingly demonstrated this benefit.

METHODS

This is a report of a randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial with a crossover design using oat bran (28 g [1 oz] twice daily) vs wheat cereal as a supplement to a fat-modified diet for the reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. The study included male and female subjects aged 20 to 70 years, with baseline LDL cholesterol in the 50th to 95th percentile. All subjects were instructed in the American Heart Association Step I (AHA-I) diet, and eating behavior was monitored using 4-day food records during each study period.

RESULTS

Eighty-two percent (n = 145) of the total number of subjects who were randomized to treatment groups completed the study. Blood lipid studies demonstrated significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol (average -2.2%) and LDL cholesterol (average -3.9%) in the oat-bran groups than in the wheat-cereal groups (average total cholesterol +3.3%, average LDL cholesterol +4.0%) or in the diet alone group (total cholesterol +6.0%; LDL cholesterol +6.4%). All groups did comparably well at adhering to the AHA-I diet; however, dietary factors alone, when analyzed by the Keys equations, could not explain the group differences in lipid change.

CONCLUSIONS

The addition of oat bran (28 g [1 oz] twice daily) to the AHA-I diet provided significant added benefit in lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in most hypercholesterolemic subjects. Analysis for factors that predict LDL cholesterol response to oat bran revealed a significant age-by-sex interaction (P less than .001). Women under the age of 50 years, as a group, showed essentially no increased benefit from the addition of oat bran to their diet. Cholesterol levels in older women appear to be significantly more responsive to a modified diet containing oat bran than those of younger women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55414.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1660530

Citation

Keenan, J M., et al. "Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Trial of Oat Bran in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects." The Journal of Family Practice, vol. 33, no. 6, 1991, pp. 600-8.
Keenan JM, Wenz JB, Myers S, et al. Randomized, controlled, crossover trial of oat bran in hypercholesterolemic subjects. J Fam Pract. 1991;33(6):600-8.
Keenan, J. M., Wenz, J. B., Myers, S., Ripsin, C., & Huang, Z. Q. (1991). Randomized, controlled, crossover trial of oat bran in hypercholesterolemic subjects. The Journal of Family Practice, 33(6), 600-8.
Keenan JM, et al. Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Trial of Oat Bran in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects. J Fam Pract. 1991;33(6):600-8. PubMed PMID: 1660530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized, controlled, crossover trial of oat bran in hypercholesterolemic subjects. AU - Keenan,J M, AU - Wenz,J B, AU - Myers,S, AU - Ripsin,C, AU - Huang,Z Q, PY - 1991/12/1/pubmed PY - 1991/12/1/medline PY - 1991/12/1/entrez SP - 600 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of family practice JO - J Fam Pract VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite animal and metabolic ward studies that support the benefit of oat bran as a useful dietary supplement for the lowering of cholesterol, there have been few controlled studies on free-living subjects that have convincingly demonstrated this benefit. METHODS: This is a report of a randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial with a crossover design using oat bran (28 g [1 oz] twice daily) vs wheat cereal as a supplement to a fat-modified diet for the reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. The study included male and female subjects aged 20 to 70 years, with baseline LDL cholesterol in the 50th to 95th percentile. All subjects were instructed in the American Heart Association Step I (AHA-I) diet, and eating behavior was monitored using 4-day food records during each study period. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent (n = 145) of the total number of subjects who were randomized to treatment groups completed the study. Blood lipid studies demonstrated significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol (average -2.2%) and LDL cholesterol (average -3.9%) in the oat-bran groups than in the wheat-cereal groups (average total cholesterol +3.3%, average LDL cholesterol +4.0%) or in the diet alone group (total cholesterol +6.0%; LDL cholesterol +6.4%). All groups did comparably well at adhering to the AHA-I diet; however, dietary factors alone, when analyzed by the Keys equations, could not explain the group differences in lipid change. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of oat bran (28 g [1 oz] twice daily) to the AHA-I diet provided significant added benefit in lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in most hypercholesterolemic subjects. Analysis for factors that predict LDL cholesterol response to oat bran revealed a significant age-by-sex interaction (P less than .001). Women under the age of 50 years, as a group, showed essentially no increased benefit from the addition of oat bran to their diet. Cholesterol levels in older women appear to be significantly more responsive to a modified diet containing oat bran than those of younger women. SN - 0094-3509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1660530/Randomized_controlled_crossover_trial_of_oat_bran_in_hypercholesterolemic_subjects_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterollevelswhatyouneedtoknow.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -