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Allowing for variations in multivitamin supplement composition improves nutrient intake estimates for epidemiologic studies.
J Nutr. 2006 May; 136(5):1359-64.JN

Abstract

Collecting detailed data on dietary supplement use is time-consuming for study participants and investigators, and this is particularly difficult for multivitamin use because of the many different formulations available. Therefore, many studies simply ask about the frequency of multivitamin use and assign default nutrient composition values to obtain nutrient intakes. Multivitamin supplements are important contributors to total nutrient intakes, but it is not known how default values affect the accuracy of intake estimation. In this study, nutrient intakes were calculated from multivitamins consumed by 26,735 multivitamin users who provided detailed information like product name(s) and frequency of use on a mailed questionnaire. We then recalculated the intakes, using 2 different assumptions about the composition of the multivitamin supplements: 1) a single default composition for all products; and 2) four default compositions, 1 for each subtype of multivitamin, i.e., one-a-day with minerals, one-a-day without minerals, B-complex or stress multivitamins, and antioxidant combinations. A total of 1246 different brands of multivitamins were reported and nutrient composition varied widely. Spearman correlation coefficient analyses, using the 4 default nutrient profiles compared with actual nutrient intakes, were >0.5 (P < 0.001) for 12 of 15 nutrients examined. However, correlations using the single default were lower, with only 5 correlations >0.5. Our findings suggest that a questionnaire designed to assess the composition profiles for 4 types of multivitamin products substantially improves the accuracy of nutrient-intake estimates over one that uses a single default nutrient profile for all multivitamin products.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813, USA. spark@crch.hawaii.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16614430

Citation

Park, Song-Yi, et al. "Allowing for Variations in Multivitamin Supplement Composition Improves Nutrient Intake Estimates for Epidemiologic Studies." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 136, no. 5, 2006, pp. 1359-64.
Park SY, Murphy SP, Wilkens LR, et al. Allowing for variations in multivitamin supplement composition improves nutrient intake estimates for epidemiologic studies. J Nutr. 2006;136(5):1359-64.
Park, S. Y., Murphy, S. P., Wilkens, L. R., Yamamoto, J. F., & Kolonel, L. N. (2006). Allowing for variations in multivitamin supplement composition improves nutrient intake estimates for epidemiologic studies. The Journal of Nutrition, 136(5), 1359-64.
Park SY, et al. Allowing for Variations in Multivitamin Supplement Composition Improves Nutrient Intake Estimates for Epidemiologic Studies. J Nutr. 2006;136(5):1359-64. PubMed PMID: 16614430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allowing for variations in multivitamin supplement composition improves nutrient intake estimates for epidemiologic studies. AU - Park,Song-Yi, AU - Murphy,Suzanne P, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Yamamoto,Jennifer F, AU - Kolonel,Laurence N, PY - 2006/4/15/pubmed PY - 2006/6/24/medline PY - 2006/4/15/entrez SP - 1359 EP - 64 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 136 IS - 5 N2 - Collecting detailed data on dietary supplement use is time-consuming for study participants and investigators, and this is particularly difficult for multivitamin use because of the many different formulations available. Therefore, many studies simply ask about the frequency of multivitamin use and assign default nutrient composition values to obtain nutrient intakes. Multivitamin supplements are important contributors to total nutrient intakes, but it is not known how default values affect the accuracy of intake estimation. In this study, nutrient intakes were calculated from multivitamins consumed by 26,735 multivitamin users who provided detailed information like product name(s) and frequency of use on a mailed questionnaire. We then recalculated the intakes, using 2 different assumptions about the composition of the multivitamin supplements: 1) a single default composition for all products; and 2) four default compositions, 1 for each subtype of multivitamin, i.e., one-a-day with minerals, one-a-day without minerals, B-complex or stress multivitamins, and antioxidant combinations. A total of 1246 different brands of multivitamins were reported and nutrient composition varied widely. Spearman correlation coefficient analyses, using the 4 default nutrient profiles compared with actual nutrient intakes, were >0.5 (P < 0.001) for 12 of 15 nutrients examined. However, correlations using the single default were lower, with only 5 correlations >0.5. Our findings suggest that a questionnaire designed to assess the composition profiles for 4 types of multivitamin products substantially improves the accuracy of nutrient-intake estimates over one that uses a single default nutrient profile for all multivitamin products. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16614430/Allowing_for_variations_in_multivitamin_supplement_composition_improves_nutrient_intake_estimates_for_epidemiologic_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/136.5.1359 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -