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The influence of glucose self-monitoring on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus in Sudan.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006 Oct; 74(1):90-4.DR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the influence of self-monitoring of glucose on the glycaemic control in Sudanese diabetic subjects.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A group of 193 consecutive type 2 and type 1 diabetic subjects (95 men, 98 women) were studied. In 104 subjects with type 2 diabetes fasting blood glucose was measured using a glucose meter and blood was obtained for serum glucose measurement in the laboratory. In the remaining 89 diabetic subjects random blood glucose was measured using the same glucose meter and a whole blood sample was drawn for laboratory assessment of HbA1c. Data on self-monitoring and other clinical and personal characteristics were recorded.

RESULTS

More than 75% of either type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients never self-monitored blood or urine glucose. In type 2 diabetic subjects self-monitoring of blood or urine glucose was not related to glycaemic control. In type 1 diabetic subjects, however, self-monitoring of blood glucose was significantly associated with better glycaemic control, as assessed by HbA1c (P=0.02) and blood glucose at clinic visits (P< or =0.0001), and similar associations were found for urine glucose self-monitoring (P=0.04 and 0.02) respectively. Neither glycaemic control nor glucose self-monitoring was associated with education level.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-monitoring of blood glucose was not found to be associated to better glycaemic control in Sudanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, self-monitoring of both blood and urine glucose was significantly associated with glycaemic control in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Self-monitoring of urine glucose could be useful where measurement of blood glucose is not available or affordable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. moawia.abdelgadir@medsci.uu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16621118

Citation

Abdelgadir, M, et al. "The Influence of Glucose Self-monitoring On Glycaemic Control in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in Sudan." Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 74, no. 1, 2006, pp. 90-4.
Abdelgadir M, Elbagir M, Eltom M, et al. The influence of glucose self-monitoring on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus in Sudan. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006;74(1):90-4.
Abdelgadir, M., Elbagir, M., Eltom, M., & Berne, C. (2006). The influence of glucose self-monitoring on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus in Sudan. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 74(1), 90-4.
Abdelgadir M, et al. The Influence of Glucose Self-monitoring On Glycaemic Control in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in Sudan. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006;74(1):90-4. PubMed PMID: 16621118.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of glucose self-monitoring on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus in Sudan. AU - Abdelgadir,M, AU - Elbagir,M, AU - Eltom,M, AU - Berne,C, Y1 - 2006/04/18/ PY - 2005/03/24/received PY - 2006/02/12/revised PY - 2006/03/07/accepted PY - 2006/4/20/pubmed PY - 2007/1/31/medline PY - 2006/4/20/entrez SP - 90 EP - 4 JF - Diabetes research and clinical practice JO - Diabetes Res Clin Pract VL - 74 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of self-monitoring of glucose on the glycaemic control in Sudanese diabetic subjects. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A group of 193 consecutive type 2 and type 1 diabetic subjects (95 men, 98 women) were studied. In 104 subjects with type 2 diabetes fasting blood glucose was measured using a glucose meter and blood was obtained for serum glucose measurement in the laboratory. In the remaining 89 diabetic subjects random blood glucose was measured using the same glucose meter and a whole blood sample was drawn for laboratory assessment of HbA1c. Data on self-monitoring and other clinical and personal characteristics were recorded. RESULTS: More than 75% of either type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients never self-monitored blood or urine glucose. In type 2 diabetic subjects self-monitoring of blood or urine glucose was not related to glycaemic control. In type 1 diabetic subjects, however, self-monitoring of blood glucose was significantly associated with better glycaemic control, as assessed by HbA1c (P=0.02) and blood glucose at clinic visits (P< or =0.0001), and similar associations were found for urine glucose self-monitoring (P=0.04 and 0.02) respectively. Neither glycaemic control nor glucose self-monitoring was associated with education level. CONCLUSIONS: Self-monitoring of blood glucose was not found to be associated to better glycaemic control in Sudanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, self-monitoring of both blood and urine glucose was significantly associated with glycaemic control in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Self-monitoring of urine glucose could be useful where measurement of blood glucose is not available or affordable. SN - 0168-8227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16621118/The_influence_of_glucose_self_monitoring_on_glycaemic_control_in_patients_with_diabetes_mellitus_in_Sudan_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -