Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Energy and protein intakes of acute stroke patients.
J Nutr Health Aging. 2006 May-Jun; 10(3):171-5.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although protein-energy malnutrition has been cited as a frequent complication following stroke, there is very little data describing nutritional intake among hospitalized patients.

OBJECTIVE

To report: i) the level of protein and energy intake, ii) the adequacy of intake during the first 21 days of hospitalization and iii) to examine the differences in nutritional intake associated with diet type (regular texture, texture-modified and enteral feeding).

DESIGN

Prospective observational study of an inception cohort. The energy and protein intakes of well-nourished patients with recent onset of first time stroke were assessed at admission to hospital and at days 7, 11, 14 and 21. Adequacy of energy intake at each of these intervals was expressed as a percentage (actual intake/energy requirement assessed by indirect calorimetry x 100). Adequacy of protein intake was assessed in a similar manner, with 1 g/kg of actual or adjusted body weight used to estimate requirement. The nutritional intakes of patients receiving regular diets, dysphagia diets and enteral tube feedings were compared using one-way ANOVA.

RESULTS

The average energy intakes of the entire study group ranged from 19.4-22.3 Kcals/kg/day over five observation points, representing 80.3-90.9% of measured requirements; protein intake and ranged from 0.81-0.90 g/kg day yielding adequacy of intake of 81-90% of requirement. There were significant differences in energy intakes and/or adequacy of intake of patients receiving different diet types at days 11, 14 and 21 (p < 0.05) and differences in protein intake and/or adequacy of protein intake at all intervals except admission (p < 0.05). Patients receiving enteral tube feedings consumed more calories and protein compared to those patients on regular or dysphagia diets.

CONCLUSIONS

On average, newly diagnosed, well-nourished, hospitalized patients consumed 80-91% of their both their energy and protein requirements, in the early post stroke period.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Parkwood Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Care London, Ontario N6C 5J1, Canada. norinef.foley@sjhc.london.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16622579

Citation

Foley, N, et al. "Energy and Protein Intakes of Acute Stroke Patients." The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 10, no. 3, 2006, pp. 171-5.
Foley N, Finestone H, Woodbury MG, et al. Energy and protein intakes of acute stroke patients. J Nutr Health Aging. 2006;10(3):171-5.
Foley, N., Finestone, H., Woodbury, M. G., Teasell, R., & Greene Finestone, L. (2006). Energy and protein intakes of acute stroke patients. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 10(3), 171-5.
Foley N, et al. Energy and Protein Intakes of Acute Stroke Patients. J Nutr Health Aging. 2006 May-Jun;10(3):171-5. PubMed PMID: 16622579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy and protein intakes of acute stroke patients. AU - Foley,N, AU - Finestone,H, AU - Woodbury,M G, AU - Teasell,R, AU - Greene Finestone,L, PY - 2006/4/20/pubmed PY - 2006/10/3/medline PY - 2006/4/20/entrez SP - 171 EP - 5 JF - The journal of nutrition, health & aging JO - J Nutr Health Aging VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although protein-energy malnutrition has been cited as a frequent complication following stroke, there is very little data describing nutritional intake among hospitalized patients. OBJECTIVE: To report: i) the level of protein and energy intake, ii) the adequacy of intake during the first 21 days of hospitalization and iii) to examine the differences in nutritional intake associated with diet type (regular texture, texture-modified and enteral feeding). DESIGN: Prospective observational study of an inception cohort. The energy and protein intakes of well-nourished patients with recent onset of first time stroke were assessed at admission to hospital and at days 7, 11, 14 and 21. Adequacy of energy intake at each of these intervals was expressed as a percentage (actual intake/energy requirement assessed by indirect calorimetry x 100). Adequacy of protein intake was assessed in a similar manner, with 1 g/kg of actual or adjusted body weight used to estimate requirement. The nutritional intakes of patients receiving regular diets, dysphagia diets and enteral tube feedings were compared using one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The average energy intakes of the entire study group ranged from 19.4-22.3 Kcals/kg/day over five observation points, representing 80.3-90.9% of measured requirements; protein intake and ranged from 0.81-0.90 g/kg day yielding adequacy of intake of 81-90% of requirement. There were significant differences in energy intakes and/or adequacy of intake of patients receiving different diet types at days 11, 14 and 21 (p < 0.05) and differences in protein intake and/or adequacy of protein intake at all intervals except admission (p < 0.05). Patients receiving enteral tube feedings consumed more calories and protein compared to those patients on regular or dysphagia diets. CONCLUSIONS: On average, newly diagnosed, well-nourished, hospitalized patients consumed 80-91% of their both their energy and protein requirements, in the early post stroke period. SN - 1279-7707 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16622579/Energy_and_protein_intakes_of_acute_stroke_patients_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/swallowingdisorders.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -