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A noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to assess whole-body nitric oxide synthesis in children.
Pediatr Res. 2006 May; 59(5):736-41.PR

Abstract

Determination of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo is essential to understand the pathophysiologic role and therapeutic implications of the L-arginine/NO pathway in pediatric diseases. The aim of this study was to establish a noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to determine whole-body NO synthesis in healthy children. Seventeen healthy children (eight boys/nine girls, 4-16 y) were studied twice, and six of them on three occasions. Fasting children received a single oral dose of nonradioactive L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine (5 mg/kg body weight). Complete 24-h urine collections were subsequently performed on an ambulatory basis. Total urinary nitrate excretion and [15N]nitrate enrichments were determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometric techniques. The mean urinary [15N]nitrate enrichments on the 0-12-h/12-24-h collection periods of three study visits were 0.9309%/0.5910%, 0.9056%/0.6214%, and 0.9087%/0.6059%. The levels of 24-h urinary [15N]nitrate excretion [mean (95% confidence interval)] for three study visits were 11.70 (8.85-14.54), 12.21 (9.61-14.82), and 11.37 (7.96-14.77) microg [15N]nitrogen-nitrate/mmol creatinine, respectively. Within-subject coefficient of variation for 24-h urinary [15N]nitrate excretion was 11.87%. Agreement among results was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (0.93) and coefficient of repeatability (4.08). The percentage of L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine dose directed to nitric oxide synthesis was 0.221% [0.181-0.261]. Multiple regression analysis showed age as the predictor variable of whole-body NO synthesis. These results show for the first time that a single oral administration of L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine can be used to reliably and specifically determine whole-body NO synthesis in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, R3E OT6 Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. pforte@cc.umanitoba.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16627892

Citation

Forte, Pablo, et al. "A Noninvasive, Sensitive, Specific, and Reliable Approach to Assess Whole-body Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Children." Pediatric Research, vol. 59, no. 5, 2006, pp. 736-41.
Forte P, Ogborn MR, Lilley-Chan T. A noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to assess whole-body nitric oxide synthesis in children. Pediatr Res. 2006;59(5):736-41.
Forte, P., Ogborn, M. R., & Lilley-Chan, T. (2006). A noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to assess whole-body nitric oxide synthesis in children. Pediatric Research, 59(5), 736-41.
Forte P, Ogborn MR, Lilley-Chan T. A Noninvasive, Sensitive, Specific, and Reliable Approach to Assess Whole-body Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Children. Pediatr Res. 2006;59(5):736-41. PubMed PMID: 16627892.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to assess whole-body nitric oxide synthesis in children. AU - Forte,Pablo, AU - Ogborn,Malcolm R, AU - Lilley-Chan,Tanya, PY - 2006/4/22/pubmed PY - 2006/6/24/medline PY - 2006/4/22/entrez SP - 736 EP - 41 JF - Pediatric research JO - Pediatr. Res. VL - 59 IS - 5 N2 - Determination of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo is essential to understand the pathophysiologic role and therapeutic implications of the L-arginine/NO pathway in pediatric diseases. The aim of this study was to establish a noninvasive, sensitive, specific, and reliable approach to determine whole-body NO synthesis in healthy children. Seventeen healthy children (eight boys/nine girls, 4-16 y) were studied twice, and six of them on three occasions. Fasting children received a single oral dose of nonradioactive L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine (5 mg/kg body weight). Complete 24-h urine collections were subsequently performed on an ambulatory basis. Total urinary nitrate excretion and [15N]nitrate enrichments were determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometric techniques. The mean urinary [15N]nitrate enrichments on the 0-12-h/12-24-h collection periods of three study visits were 0.9309%/0.5910%, 0.9056%/0.6214%, and 0.9087%/0.6059%. The levels of 24-h urinary [15N]nitrate excretion [mean (95% confidence interval)] for three study visits were 11.70 (8.85-14.54), 12.21 (9.61-14.82), and 11.37 (7.96-14.77) microg [15N]nitrogen-nitrate/mmol creatinine, respectively. Within-subject coefficient of variation for 24-h urinary [15N]nitrate excretion was 11.87%. Agreement among results was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (0.93) and coefficient of repeatability (4.08). The percentage of L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine dose directed to nitric oxide synthesis was 0.221% [0.181-0.261]. Multiple regression analysis showed age as the predictor variable of whole-body NO synthesis. These results show for the first time that a single oral administration of L-[15N]2-guanidino arginine can be used to reliably and specifically determine whole-body NO synthesis in children. SN - 0031-3998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16627892/A_noninvasive_sensitive_specific_and_reliable_approach_to_assess_whole_body_nitric_oxide_synthesis_in_children_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.pdr.0000214880.15623.84 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -