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Measles immunity and immunisation status in Australian children 1 to 4 years of age.
J Paediatr Child Health. 2006 Apr; 42(4):165-9.JP

Abstract

AIM

Determine measles seropositivity and vaccine coverage in children aged 1 to 4 years inclusive. Compare data in those who produced immunisation records and those who relied on parental recall. Establish variables associated with seropositivity.

METHODS

DESIGN

Population- and area-based, cluster sample of 1- to 4-year-olds; households surveyed by trained interviewer.

SETTING

Australia-wide, excluding New South Wales. Questionnaires completed between February and April 1995.

SUBJECTS

2117 completed questionnaires were returned for children aged 1 to 4 years, 923 of whom provided a sufficient blood sample for analysis.

RESULTS

Overall seropositivity was 86% for the 923 children tested and was strongly associated with previous immunisation (P < 0.001) and age (P < 0.001), but not with parental report of a previous measles diagnosis (P = 0.581). Eight hundred and forty-three (91%) reported previous measles immunisation, with 760 (90%) of these testing seropositive. Four hundred and ninety-one (55%) parents/guardians produced immunisation records, while 400 (45%) relied on recall. Immunised children whose parents relied on recall were equally likely to be seropositive as children whose parents produced records. The 923 children tested were representative of the 2117 who completed questionnaires in all factors except age, where children below 2 years old were under represented (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

These data support the current second routine measles immunisation prior to school entry, and reinforce the need to promote the first routine dose to achieve measles elimination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Australia. g.hogg@mdu.unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16630315

Citation

Hogg, Geoffry G., et al. "Measles Immunity and Immunisation Status in Australian Children 1 to 4 Years of Age." Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 42, no. 4, 2006, pp. 165-9.
Hogg GG, Darlington RJ, Hogg KG, et al. Measles immunity and immunisation status in Australian children 1 to 4 years of age. J Paediatr Child Health. 2006;42(4):165-9.
Hogg, G. G., Darlington, R. J., Hogg, K. G., & Lester, R. (2006). Measles immunity and immunisation status in Australian children 1 to 4 years of age. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 42(4), 165-9.
Hogg GG, et al. Measles Immunity and Immunisation Status in Australian Children 1 to 4 Years of Age. J Paediatr Child Health. 2006;42(4):165-9. PubMed PMID: 16630315.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measles immunity and immunisation status in Australian children 1 to 4 years of age. AU - Hogg,Geoffry G, AU - Darlington,Raelene J, AU - Hogg,Katharine G, AU - Lester,Rosemary, PY - 2006/4/25/pubmed PY - 2007/6/28/medline PY - 2006/4/25/entrez SP - 165 EP - 9 JF - Journal of paediatrics and child health JO - J Paediatr Child Health VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - AIM: Determine measles seropositivity and vaccine coverage in children aged 1 to 4 years inclusive. Compare data in those who produced immunisation records and those who relied on parental recall. Establish variables associated with seropositivity. METHODS: DESIGN: Population- and area-based, cluster sample of 1- to 4-year-olds; households surveyed by trained interviewer. SETTING: Australia-wide, excluding New South Wales. Questionnaires completed between February and April 1995. SUBJECTS: 2117 completed questionnaires were returned for children aged 1 to 4 years, 923 of whom provided a sufficient blood sample for analysis. RESULTS: Overall seropositivity was 86% for the 923 children tested and was strongly associated with previous immunisation (P < 0.001) and age (P < 0.001), but not with parental report of a previous measles diagnosis (P = 0.581). Eight hundred and forty-three (91%) reported previous measles immunisation, with 760 (90%) of these testing seropositive. Four hundred and ninety-one (55%) parents/guardians produced immunisation records, while 400 (45%) relied on recall. Immunised children whose parents relied on recall were equally likely to be seropositive as children whose parents produced records. The 923 children tested were representative of the 2117 who completed questionnaires in all factors except age, where children below 2 years old were under represented (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These data support the current second routine measles immunisation prior to school entry, and reinforce the need to promote the first routine dose to achieve measles elimination. SN - 1034-4810 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16630315/Measles_immunity_and_immunisation_status_in_Australian_children_1_to_4_years_of_age_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -