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Voluntary fluid intake and core temperature responses in adolescent tennis players: sports beverage versus water.
Br J Sports Med 2006; 40(5):406-10BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine differences in ad libitum fluid intake, comparing a 6% carbohydrate/electrolyte drink (CHO-E) and water, and associated differences in core temperature and other selected physiological and perceptual responses in adolescent athletes during tennis training in the heat.

METHODS

Fourteen healthy, fit, young tennis players (nine male; five female; mean (SD) age 15.1 (1.4) years; weight 60.6 (8.3) kg; height 172.8 (8.6) cm) completed two 120 minute tennis specific training sessions on separate days (randomised, crossover design) in a warm environment (wet bulb globe temperature: CHO-E, 79.3 (2.6) degrees F; water, 79.9 (2.2) degrees F; p>0.05).

RESULTS

There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the trials with respect to fluid intake, urine volume, fluid retention, sweat loss, perceived exertion, thirst, or gastrointestinal discomfort. However, there was a difference (p<0.05) in the percentage body weight change after training (CHO-E, -0.5 (0.7)%; water, -0.9 (0.6)%). Urine specific gravity before training (CHO-E, 1.024 (0.006); water, 1.025 (0.005)) did not correlate significantly (p>0.05) with any of these measurements or with core body temperature. In examining the main effect for trial, the CHO-E trial showed a significantly lower (p<0.001) mean body temperature (irrespective of measurement time) than the water trial. However, the mean body temperature in each trial was not associated (p>0.05) with fluid intake, fluid retention, sweat loss, or percentage body weight change.

CONCLUSION

Ad libitum consumption of a CHO-E drink may be more effective than water in minimising fluid deficits and mean core temperature responses during tennis and other similar training in adolescent athletes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Therapy, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912-0800, USA. mbergero@mcg.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16632570

Citation

Bergeron, M F., et al. "Voluntary Fluid Intake and Core Temperature Responses in Adolescent Tennis Players: Sports Beverage Versus Water." British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 40, no. 5, 2006, pp. 406-10.
Bergeron MF, Waller JL, Marinik EL. Voluntary fluid intake and core temperature responses in adolescent tennis players: sports beverage versus water. Br J Sports Med. 2006;40(5):406-10.
Bergeron, M. F., Waller, J. L., & Marinik, E. L. (2006). Voluntary fluid intake and core temperature responses in adolescent tennis players: sports beverage versus water. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(5), pp. 406-10.
Bergeron MF, Waller JL, Marinik EL. Voluntary Fluid Intake and Core Temperature Responses in Adolescent Tennis Players: Sports Beverage Versus Water. Br J Sports Med. 2006;40(5):406-10. PubMed PMID: 16632570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Voluntary fluid intake and core temperature responses in adolescent tennis players: sports beverage versus water. AU - Bergeron,M F, AU - Waller,J L, AU - Marinik,E L, PY - 2006/4/25/pubmed PY - 2006/6/7/medline PY - 2006/4/25/entrez SP - 406 EP - 10 JF - British journal of sports medicine JO - Br J Sports Med VL - 40 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine differences in ad libitum fluid intake, comparing a 6% carbohydrate/electrolyte drink (CHO-E) and water, and associated differences in core temperature and other selected physiological and perceptual responses in adolescent athletes during tennis training in the heat. METHODS: Fourteen healthy, fit, young tennis players (nine male; five female; mean (SD) age 15.1 (1.4) years; weight 60.6 (8.3) kg; height 172.8 (8.6) cm) completed two 120 minute tennis specific training sessions on separate days (randomised, crossover design) in a warm environment (wet bulb globe temperature: CHO-E, 79.3 (2.6) degrees F; water, 79.9 (2.2) degrees F; p>0.05). RESULTS: There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the trials with respect to fluid intake, urine volume, fluid retention, sweat loss, perceived exertion, thirst, or gastrointestinal discomfort. However, there was a difference (p<0.05) in the percentage body weight change after training (CHO-E, -0.5 (0.7)%; water, -0.9 (0.6)%). Urine specific gravity before training (CHO-E, 1.024 (0.006); water, 1.025 (0.005)) did not correlate significantly (p>0.05) with any of these measurements or with core body temperature. In examining the main effect for trial, the CHO-E trial showed a significantly lower (p<0.001) mean body temperature (irrespective of measurement time) than the water trial. However, the mean body temperature in each trial was not associated (p>0.05) with fluid intake, fluid retention, sweat loss, or percentage body weight change. CONCLUSION: Ad libitum consumption of a CHO-E drink may be more effective than water in minimising fluid deficits and mean core temperature responses during tennis and other similar training in adolescent athletes. SN - 1473-0480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16632570/Voluntary_fluid_intake_and_core_temperature_responses_in_adolescent_tennis_players:_sports_beverage_versus_water_ L2 - http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16632570 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -