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Emerging approaches for prophylaxis and management of oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy.
Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 2006; 11(2):353-73EO

Abstract

Oral mucositis is a common treatment-limiting side effect of cancer therapy that may have a significant impact on quality of life and on the cost of care. Oral mucositis is the most distressing complication of cancer therapy as reported by head and neck cancer patients, in patients receiving dose-dense myelosuppressive chemotherapy and in patients receiving haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Mucositis may increase the risk of local and systemic infection, particularly in myelosuppressed patients. Severe oral mucositis can lead to the need to interrupt or discontinue cancer therapy, and thus may impact cure of the primary disease. Current care of patients with mucositis is essentially palliative, and includes appropriate oral hygiene, nonirritating diet and oral care products, topical palliative mouth rinses, topical anaesthetics and use of systemic opioid analgesics. Emerging approaches for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis are developing based on an increasing understanding of the pathobiology of mucosal damage and repair. New interventions are expected to be administered based on the mechanisms of initiation, progression and resolution of the condition. The approval by the FDA of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin; Amgen) in 2004 represents a new step in prevention of oral mucositis in stem cell transplant patients based on the increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Progress in the prevention and management of mucositis will improve quality of life, reduce cost of care and facilitate completion of more intensive cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols. Improved management of mucositis may allow implementation of cancer treatment protocols that are currently excessively mucotoxic, but have potentially higher cure rates of the malignant disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, 801 South Paulina St, MC 838, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16634706

Citation

Epstein, Joel B., and Gary D. Klasser. "Emerging Approaches for Prophylaxis and Management of Oropharyngeal Mucositis in Cancer Therapy." Expert Opinion On Emerging Drugs, vol. 11, no. 2, 2006, pp. 353-73.
Epstein JB, Klasser GD. Emerging approaches for prophylaxis and management of oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy. Expert Opin Emerg Drugs. 2006;11(2):353-73.
Epstein, J. B., & Klasser, G. D. (2006). Emerging approaches for prophylaxis and management of oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy. Expert Opinion On Emerging Drugs, 11(2), pp. 353-73.
Epstein JB, Klasser GD. Emerging Approaches for Prophylaxis and Management of Oropharyngeal Mucositis in Cancer Therapy. Expert Opin Emerg Drugs. 2006;11(2):353-73. PubMed PMID: 16634706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emerging approaches for prophylaxis and management of oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy. AU - Epstein,Joel B, AU - Klasser,Gary D, PY - 2006/4/26/pubmed PY - 2006/8/4/medline PY - 2006/4/26/entrez SP - 353 EP - 73 JF - Expert opinion on emerging drugs JO - Expert Opin Emerg Drugs VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - Oral mucositis is a common treatment-limiting side effect of cancer therapy that may have a significant impact on quality of life and on the cost of care. Oral mucositis is the most distressing complication of cancer therapy as reported by head and neck cancer patients, in patients receiving dose-dense myelosuppressive chemotherapy and in patients receiving haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Mucositis may increase the risk of local and systemic infection, particularly in myelosuppressed patients. Severe oral mucositis can lead to the need to interrupt or discontinue cancer therapy, and thus may impact cure of the primary disease. Current care of patients with mucositis is essentially palliative, and includes appropriate oral hygiene, nonirritating diet and oral care products, topical palliative mouth rinses, topical anaesthetics and use of systemic opioid analgesics. Emerging approaches for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis are developing based on an increasing understanding of the pathobiology of mucosal damage and repair. New interventions are expected to be administered based on the mechanisms of initiation, progression and resolution of the condition. The approval by the FDA of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin; Amgen) in 2004 represents a new step in prevention of oral mucositis in stem cell transplant patients based on the increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Progress in the prevention and management of mucositis will improve quality of life, reduce cost of care and facilitate completion of more intensive cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols. Improved management of mucositis may allow implementation of cancer treatment protocols that are currently excessively mucotoxic, but have potentially higher cure rates of the malignant disease. SN - 1744-7623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16634706/Emerging_approaches_for_prophylaxis_and_management_of_oropharyngeal_mucositis_in_cancer_therapy_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1517/14728214.11.2.353 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -