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Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in men and women: a prospective cohort study.
Circulation 2006; 113(17):2045-53Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We examined the association between long-term habitual coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

METHODS AND RESULTS

We performed a prospective cohort study with 44,005 men and 84,488 women without history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Coffee consumption was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women and then repeatedly every 2 to 4 years; the follow-up continued through 2000. We documented 2173 incident cases of coronary heart disease (1449 nonfatal myocardial infarctions and 724 fatal cases of CHD) among men and 2254 cases (1561 nonfatal myocardial infarctions and 693 fatal cases of CHD) among women. Among men, after adjustment for age, smoking, and other CHD risk factors, the relative risks (RRs) of CHD across categories of cumulative coffee consumption (<1 cup/mo, 1 cup/mo to 4 cups/wk, 5 to 7 cups/wk, 2 to 3 cups/d, 4 to 5 cups/d, and > or =6 cups/d) were 1.0, 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.17), 1.02 (0.91 to 1.15), 0.97 (0.86 to 1.11), 1.07 (0.88 to 1.31), and 0.72 (0.49 to 1.07; P for trend=0.41); among women, the RRs were 1.0, 0.97 (0.83 to 1.14), 1.02 (0.90 to 1.17), 0.84 (0.74 to 0.97), 0.99 (0.83 to 1.17), and 0.87 (0.68 to 1.11; P for trend=0.08). Stratification by smoking status, alcohol consumption, history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index gave similar results. Similarly, we found no effect when the most recent coffee consumption was examined. RRs for quintiles of caffeine intake varied from 0.97 (0.84 to 1.10) in the second quintile to 0.97 (0.84 to 1.11) in the highest quintile (P for trend=0.82) in men and from 1.02 (0.90 to 1.16) to 0.97 (0.85 to 1.11; P for trend=0.37) in women.

CONCLUSIONS

These data do not provide any evidence that coffee consumption increases the risk of CHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16636169

Citation

Lopez-Garcia, Esther, et al. "Coffee Consumption and Coronary Heart Disease in Men and Women: a Prospective Cohort Study." Circulation, vol. 113, no. 17, 2006, pp. 2045-53.
Lopez-Garcia E, van Dam RM, Willett WC, et al. Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in men and women: a prospective cohort study. Circulation. 2006;113(17):2045-53.
Lopez-Garcia, E., van Dam, R. M., Willett, W. C., Rimm, E. B., Manson, J. E., Stampfer, M. J., ... Hu, F. B. (2006). Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in men and women: a prospective cohort study. Circulation, 113(17), pp. 2045-53.
Lopez-Garcia E, et al. Coffee Consumption and Coronary Heart Disease in Men and Women: a Prospective Cohort Study. Circulation. 2006 May 2;113(17):2045-53. PubMed PMID: 16636169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in men and women: a prospective cohort study. AU - Lopez-Garcia,Esther, AU - van Dam,Rob M, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Rexrode,Kathryn M, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2006/04/24/ PY - 2006/4/26/pubmed PY - 2006/5/13/medline PY - 2006/4/26/entrez SP - 2045 EP - 53 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 113 IS - 17 N2 - BACKGROUND: We examined the association between long-term habitual coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective cohort study with 44,005 men and 84,488 women without history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Coffee consumption was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women and then repeatedly every 2 to 4 years; the follow-up continued through 2000. We documented 2173 incident cases of coronary heart disease (1449 nonfatal myocardial infarctions and 724 fatal cases of CHD) among men and 2254 cases (1561 nonfatal myocardial infarctions and 693 fatal cases of CHD) among women. Among men, after adjustment for age, smoking, and other CHD risk factors, the relative risks (RRs) of CHD across categories of cumulative coffee consumption (<1 cup/mo, 1 cup/mo to 4 cups/wk, 5 to 7 cups/wk, 2 to 3 cups/d, 4 to 5 cups/d, and > or =6 cups/d) were 1.0, 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.17), 1.02 (0.91 to 1.15), 0.97 (0.86 to 1.11), 1.07 (0.88 to 1.31), and 0.72 (0.49 to 1.07; P for trend=0.41); among women, the RRs were 1.0, 0.97 (0.83 to 1.14), 1.02 (0.90 to 1.17), 0.84 (0.74 to 0.97), 0.99 (0.83 to 1.17), and 0.87 (0.68 to 1.11; P for trend=0.08). Stratification by smoking status, alcohol consumption, history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index gave similar results. Similarly, we found no effect when the most recent coffee consumption was examined. RRs for quintiles of caffeine intake varied from 0.97 (0.84 to 1.10) in the second quintile to 0.97 (0.84 to 1.11) in the highest quintile (P for trend=0.82) in men and from 1.02 (0.90 to 1.16) to 0.97 (0.85 to 1.11; P for trend=0.37) in women. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not provide any evidence that coffee consumption increases the risk of CHD. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16636169/Coffee_consumption_and_coronary_heart_disease_in_men_and_women:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.598664?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -