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Microbicides and other topical strategies to prevent vaginal transmission of HIV.
Nat Rev Immunol. 2006 May; 6(5):371-82.NR

Abstract

The HIV epidemic is, by many criteria, the worst outbreak of infectious disease in history. The rate of new infections is now approximately 5 million per year, mainly in the developing world, and is increasing. Women are now substantially more at risk of infection with HIV than men. With no cure or effective vaccine in sight, a huge effort is required to develop topical agents (often called microbicides) that, applied to the vaginal mucosa, would prevent infection of these high-risk individuals. We discuss the targets for topical agents that have been identified by studies of the biology of HIV infection and provide an overview of the progress towards the development of a usable agent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Case Western Reserve University, 2061 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. MXL6@case.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16639430

Citation

Lederman, Michael M., et al. "Microbicides and Other Topical Strategies to Prevent Vaginal Transmission of HIV." Nature Reviews. Immunology, vol. 6, no. 5, 2006, pp. 371-82.
Lederman MM, Offord RE, Hartley O. Microbicides and other topical strategies to prevent vaginal transmission of HIV. Nat Rev Immunol. 2006;6(5):371-82.
Lederman, M. M., Offord, R. E., & Hartley, O. (2006). Microbicides and other topical strategies to prevent vaginal transmission of HIV. Nature Reviews. Immunology, 6(5), 371-82.
Lederman MM, Offord RE, Hartley O. Microbicides and Other Topical Strategies to Prevent Vaginal Transmission of HIV. Nat Rev Immunol. 2006;6(5):371-82. PubMed PMID: 16639430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbicides and other topical strategies to prevent vaginal transmission of HIV. AU - Lederman,Michael M, AU - Offord,Robin E, AU - Hartley,Oliver, PY - 2006/4/28/pubmed PY - 2006/6/7/medline PY - 2006/4/28/entrez SP - 371 EP - 82 JF - Nature reviews. Immunology JO - Nat Rev Immunol VL - 6 IS - 5 N2 - The HIV epidemic is, by many criteria, the worst outbreak of infectious disease in history. The rate of new infections is now approximately 5 million per year, mainly in the developing world, and is increasing. Women are now substantially more at risk of infection with HIV than men. With no cure or effective vaccine in sight, a huge effort is required to develop topical agents (often called microbicides) that, applied to the vaginal mucosa, would prevent infection of these high-risk individuals. We discuss the targets for topical agents that have been identified by studies of the biology of HIV infection and provide an overview of the progress towards the development of a usable agent. SN - 1474-1733 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16639430/Microbicides_and_other_topical_strategies_to_prevent_vaginal_transmission_of_HIV_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -