Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The type of visual information mediates eye and hand movement bias when aiming to a Müller-Lyer illusion.
Exp Brain Res. 2006 Oct; 174(3):544-54.EB

Abstract

Aiming bias typically influences perception but action towards the illusory stimulus is often unaffected. Recent studies, however, have shown that the type of information available is a predictor for the expression of action bias. In the present cyclical aiming experiment, the type of information (retinal and extra-retinal) was manipulated in order to investigate the differential contributions of different cues on both eye and hand movements. The results showed that a Müller-Lyer illusion caused very similar perturbation effects on hand and eye-movement amplitudes and this bias was mediated by the type of information available on-line. Interestingly, the impact of the illusion on goal-directed movement was smaller, when information about the figure but not the hand was provided for on-line control. Saccadic information did not influence the size of the effect of a Müller-Lyer illusion on hand movements. Furthermore, the illusions did not alter the eye-hand coordination pattern. The timing of saccade termination was strongly linked to hand movement kinematics. The present results are not consistent with current dichotomous models of perception and action or movement planning and on-line control. Rather, they suggest that the type of information available for movement planning mediates the size of the illusory effects. Overall, it has been demonstrated that movement planning and control processes are versatile operations, which have the ability to adapt to the type of information available.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Kinesiology, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Motor Learning Laboratory, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. ann.lavrysen@psy.kuleuven.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16645876

Citation

Lavrysen, Ann, et al. "The Type of Visual Information Mediates Eye and Hand Movement Bias when Aiming to a Müller-Lyer Illusion." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 174, no. 3, 2006, pp. 544-54.
Lavrysen A, Helsen WF, Elliott D, et al. The type of visual information mediates eye and hand movement bias when aiming to a Müller-Lyer illusion. Exp Brain Res. 2006;174(3):544-54.
Lavrysen, A., Helsen, W. F., Elliott, D., Buekers, M. J., Feys, P., & Heremans, E. (2006). The type of visual information mediates eye and hand movement bias when aiming to a Müller-Lyer illusion. Experimental Brain Research, 174(3), 544-54.
Lavrysen A, et al. The Type of Visual Information Mediates Eye and Hand Movement Bias when Aiming to a Müller-Lyer Illusion. Exp Brain Res. 2006;174(3):544-54. PubMed PMID: 16645876.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The type of visual information mediates eye and hand movement bias when aiming to a Müller-Lyer illusion. AU - Lavrysen,Ann, AU - Helsen,Werner F, AU - Elliott,Digby, AU - Buekers,Martinus J, AU - Feys,Peter, AU - Heremans,Elke, Y1 - 2006/05/23/ PY - 2005/10/28/received PY - 2006/03/31/accepted PY - 2006/4/29/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/4/29/entrez SP - 544 EP - 54 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 174 IS - 3 N2 - Aiming bias typically influences perception but action towards the illusory stimulus is often unaffected. Recent studies, however, have shown that the type of information available is a predictor for the expression of action bias. In the present cyclical aiming experiment, the type of information (retinal and extra-retinal) was manipulated in order to investigate the differential contributions of different cues on both eye and hand movements. The results showed that a Müller-Lyer illusion caused very similar perturbation effects on hand and eye-movement amplitudes and this bias was mediated by the type of information available on-line. Interestingly, the impact of the illusion on goal-directed movement was smaller, when information about the figure but not the hand was provided for on-line control. Saccadic information did not influence the size of the effect of a Müller-Lyer illusion on hand movements. Furthermore, the illusions did not alter the eye-hand coordination pattern. The timing of saccade termination was strongly linked to hand movement kinematics. The present results are not consistent with current dichotomous models of perception and action or movement planning and on-line control. Rather, they suggest that the type of information available for movement planning mediates the size of the illusory effects. Overall, it has been demonstrated that movement planning and control processes are versatile operations, which have the ability to adapt to the type of information available. SN - 0014-4819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16645876/The_type_of_visual_information_mediates_eye_and_hand_movement_bias_when_aiming_to_a_Müller_Lyer_illusion_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-006-0484-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -