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High signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging as a predictor of neurobehavioral performance of workers exposed to manganese.
Neurotoxicology. 2007 Mar; 28(2):257-62.N

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Using previously obtained cross-sectional data from a nationwide survey on workers exposed to manganese (Mn), we assessed the relation of high signal intensity with neurobehavioral effects, and reevaluated the preexisting cross-sectional data to get additional findings on the relation of high signals with other Mn-exposure indices.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Subjects were the same as those in the previous study. The exposure status was reassessed based on similar exposure groups. The signal intensity of the globus pallidus (GP) relative to frontal white matter was subjectively evaluated as either with or without increased signals, and the increased signals were further graded into three categories. For quantitative evaluation of signal intensities of the GP we also calculated the pallidal index (PI). Neurobehavioral function was assessed using the World Health Organization Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery. In addition, computerized finger tapping speed was included to assess motor speed.

RESULTS

The mean blood Mn for those with grade III was significantly greater than those without increased signals and those with grade I. Airborne Mn and PI also showed similar findings. PI paralleled subjective MRI gradings. The proportion of workers with increased signals increased with all the Mn-exposure variables, airborne and blood Mn, the duration of work, and cumulative exposure. The PI was significantly associated with a correct score of pursuit aiming II tests and finger tapping of the dominant hand after control of age and educational level among neurobehavioral performances.

DISCUSSION

The present findings showed that signal index on T1-weighted MRI showed a dose-response relationship with all the Mn-exposure variables. The two neurobehavioral tests reflecting fine motor function were significantly decreased above 107.1 of PI, the cutoff point between those with and without increased signals. Hence, signal intensity on MRI is an effective predictor of the neurobehavioral performance of Mn exposed workers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational Health and Safety, Inje University, Gimhae, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16647136

Citation

Shin, Yong Chul, et al. "High Signal Intensity On Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Neurobehavioral Performance of Workers Exposed to Manganese." Neurotoxicology, vol. 28, no. 2, 2007, pp. 257-62.
Shin YC, Kim E, Cheong HK, et al. High signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging as a predictor of neurobehavioral performance of workers exposed to manganese. Neurotoxicology. 2007;28(2):257-62.
Shin, Y. C., Kim, E., Cheong, H. K., Cho, S., Sakong, J., Kim, K. S., Yang, J. S., Jin, Y. W., Kang, S. K., & Kim, Y. (2007). High signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging as a predictor of neurobehavioral performance of workers exposed to manganese. Neurotoxicology, 28(2), 257-62.
Shin YC, et al. High Signal Intensity On Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Neurobehavioral Performance of Workers Exposed to Manganese. Neurotoxicology. 2007;28(2):257-62. PubMed PMID: 16647136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging as a predictor of neurobehavioral performance of workers exposed to manganese. AU - Shin,Yong Chul, AU - Kim,Euna, AU - Cheong,Hae-Kwan, AU - Cho,Sungil, AU - Sakong,Joon, AU - Kim,Kyoo Sang, AU - Yang,Jung Sun, AU - Jin,Young-Woo, AU - Kang,Seong-Kyu, AU - Kim,Yangho, Y1 - 2006/03/28/ PY - 2005/10/16/received PY - 2006/03/10/accepted PY - 2006/5/2/pubmed PY - 2007/8/22/medline PY - 2006/5/2/entrez SP - 257 EP - 62 JF - Neurotoxicology JO - Neurotoxicology VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Using previously obtained cross-sectional data from a nationwide survey on workers exposed to manganese (Mn), we assessed the relation of high signal intensity with neurobehavioral effects, and reevaluated the preexisting cross-sectional data to get additional findings on the relation of high signals with other Mn-exposure indices. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Subjects were the same as those in the previous study. The exposure status was reassessed based on similar exposure groups. The signal intensity of the globus pallidus (GP) relative to frontal white matter was subjectively evaluated as either with or without increased signals, and the increased signals were further graded into three categories. For quantitative evaluation of signal intensities of the GP we also calculated the pallidal index (PI). Neurobehavioral function was assessed using the World Health Organization Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery. In addition, computerized finger tapping speed was included to assess motor speed. RESULTS: The mean blood Mn for those with grade III was significantly greater than those without increased signals and those with grade I. Airborne Mn and PI also showed similar findings. PI paralleled subjective MRI gradings. The proportion of workers with increased signals increased with all the Mn-exposure variables, airborne and blood Mn, the duration of work, and cumulative exposure. The PI was significantly associated with a correct score of pursuit aiming II tests and finger tapping of the dominant hand after control of age and educational level among neurobehavioral performances. DISCUSSION: The present findings showed that signal index on T1-weighted MRI showed a dose-response relationship with all the Mn-exposure variables. The two neurobehavioral tests reflecting fine motor function were significantly decreased above 107.1 of PI, the cutoff point between those with and without increased signals. Hence, signal intensity on MRI is an effective predictor of the neurobehavioral performance of Mn exposed workers. SN - 0161-813X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16647136/High_signal_intensity_on_magnetic_resonance_imaging_as_a_predictor_of_neurobehavioral_performance_of_workers_exposed_to_manganese_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-813X(06)00084-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -