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Multiple types of dieting prospectively predict weight gain during the freshman year of college.
Appetite. 2006 Jul; 47(1):83-90.A

Abstract

The freshman year of college is a period of heightened risk for weight gain. This study examined measures of restrained eating, disinhibition, and emotional eating as predictors of weight gain during the freshman year. Using Lowe's multi-factorial model of dieting, it also examined three different types of dieting as predictors of weight gain. Sixty-nine females were assessed at three points during the school year. Weight gain during the freshman year averaged 2.1 kg. None of the traditional self-report measures of restraint, disinhibition, or emotional eating were predictive of weight gain. However, both a history of weight loss dieting and weight suppression (discrepancy between highest weight ever and current weight) predicted greater weight gain, and these effects appeared to be largely independent of one another. Individuals who said they were currently dieting to lose weight gained twice as much (5.0 kg) as former dieters (2.5 kg) and three times as much as never dieters (1.6 kg), but the import of this finding was unclear because there was only a small number of current dieters (N = 7). Overall the results indicate that specific subtypes of dieting predicts weight gain during the freshman year better than more global measures of restraint or overeating.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Mail Stop 626, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA. lowe@drexel.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16650913

Citation

Lowe, Michael R., et al. "Multiple Types of Dieting Prospectively Predict Weight Gain During the Freshman Year of College." Appetite, vol. 47, no. 1, 2006, pp. 83-90.
Lowe MR, Annunziato RA, Markowitz JT, et al. Multiple types of dieting prospectively predict weight gain during the freshman year of college. Appetite. 2006;47(1):83-90.
Lowe, M. R., Annunziato, R. A., Markowitz, J. T., Didie, E., Bellace, D. L., Riddell, L., Maille, C., McKinney, S., & Stice, E. (2006). Multiple types of dieting prospectively predict weight gain during the freshman year of college. Appetite, 47(1), 83-90.
Lowe MR, et al. Multiple Types of Dieting Prospectively Predict Weight Gain During the Freshman Year of College. Appetite. 2006;47(1):83-90. PubMed PMID: 16650913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple types of dieting prospectively predict weight gain during the freshman year of college. AU - Lowe,Michael R, AU - Annunziato,Rachel A, AU - Markowitz,Jessica Tuttman, AU - Didie,Elizabeth, AU - Bellace,Dara L, AU - Riddell,Lynn, AU - Maille,Caralynn, AU - McKinney,Shortie, AU - Stice,Eric, Y1 - 2006/05/02/ PY - 2005/12/22/received PY - 2006/03/11/revised PY - 2006/03/16/accepted PY - 2006/5/3/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/5/3/entrez SP - 83 EP - 90 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 47 IS - 1 N2 - The freshman year of college is a period of heightened risk for weight gain. This study examined measures of restrained eating, disinhibition, and emotional eating as predictors of weight gain during the freshman year. Using Lowe's multi-factorial model of dieting, it also examined three different types of dieting as predictors of weight gain. Sixty-nine females were assessed at three points during the school year. Weight gain during the freshman year averaged 2.1 kg. None of the traditional self-report measures of restraint, disinhibition, or emotional eating were predictive of weight gain. However, both a history of weight loss dieting and weight suppression (discrepancy between highest weight ever and current weight) predicted greater weight gain, and these effects appeared to be largely independent of one another. Individuals who said they were currently dieting to lose weight gained twice as much (5.0 kg) as former dieters (2.5 kg) and three times as much as never dieters (1.6 kg), but the import of this finding was unclear because there was only a small number of current dieters (N = 7). Overall the results indicate that specific subtypes of dieting predicts weight gain during the freshman year better than more global measures of restraint or overeating. SN - 0195-6663 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16650913/Multiple_types_of_dieting_prospectively_predict_weight_gain_during_the_freshman_year_of_college_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -