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Psychiatric comorbidity in binge-eating disorder as a function of smoking history.
J Clin Psychiatry. 2006 Apr; 67(4):594-9.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in obese women with binge-eating disorder (BED) as a function of smoking history.

METHOD

A consecutive series of 103 obese treatment-seeking women with current DSM-IV diagnoses of BED were administered structured diagnostic interviews to assess all DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders. Participants were classified as "never" or "daily" smokers, and lifetime rates of comorbid psychopathology were compared across smoking groups using logistic regression. The study was conducted from February 2003 to March 2005.

RESULTS

Smokers were significantly more likely to meet criteria for co-occurring diagnoses of major depressive disorder (p = .03), panic disorder (p = .01), posttraumatic stress disorder (p < .05), and substance abuse or dependence (p = .01). Even after excluding participants with substance use disorders, significant differences remained, with lifetime smokers having significantly higher rates of co-occurring anxiety disorders.

CONCLUSIONS

It is possible that for some obese women with BED, binge eating and cigarette smoking share common functions, i.e., both behaviors may serve to modulate negative affect and/or anxiety. Although the current findings are consistent with a view of a common diathesis for the development of impulsive eating, cigarette or other substance use, and additional Axis I psychopathology, prospective longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate the nature of potential pathways.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. marney.white@yale.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16669724

Citation

White, Marney A., and Carlos M. Grilo. "Psychiatric Comorbidity in Binge-eating Disorder as a Function of Smoking History." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 67, no. 4, 2006, pp. 594-9.
White MA, Grilo CM. Psychiatric comorbidity in binge-eating disorder as a function of smoking history. J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;67(4):594-9.
White, M. A., & Grilo, C. M. (2006). Psychiatric comorbidity in binge-eating disorder as a function of smoking history. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 67(4), 594-9.
White MA, Grilo CM. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Binge-eating Disorder as a Function of Smoking History. J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;67(4):594-9. PubMed PMID: 16669724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychiatric comorbidity in binge-eating disorder as a function of smoking history. AU - White,Marney A, AU - Grilo,Carlos M, PY - 2006/5/4/pubmed PY - 2006/6/17/medline PY - 2006/5/4/entrez SP - 594 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 67 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in obese women with binge-eating disorder (BED) as a function of smoking history. METHOD: A consecutive series of 103 obese treatment-seeking women with current DSM-IV diagnoses of BED were administered structured diagnostic interviews to assess all DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders. Participants were classified as "never" or "daily" smokers, and lifetime rates of comorbid psychopathology were compared across smoking groups using logistic regression. The study was conducted from February 2003 to March 2005. RESULTS: Smokers were significantly more likely to meet criteria for co-occurring diagnoses of major depressive disorder (p = .03), panic disorder (p = .01), posttraumatic stress disorder (p < .05), and substance abuse or dependence (p = .01). Even after excluding participants with substance use disorders, significant differences remained, with lifetime smokers having significantly higher rates of co-occurring anxiety disorders. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible that for some obese women with BED, binge eating and cigarette smoking share common functions, i.e., both behaviors may serve to modulate negative affect and/or anxiety. Although the current findings are consistent with a view of a common diathesis for the development of impulsive eating, cigarette or other substance use, and additional Axis I psychopathology, prospective longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate the nature of potential pathways. SN - 0160-6689 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16669724/Psychiatric_comorbidity_in_binge_eating_disorder_as_a_function_of_smoking_history_ L2 - http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/pages/2006/v67n04/v67n0410.aspx DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -