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Oats in the treatment of childhood coeliac disease: a 2-year controlled trial and a long-term clinical follow-up study.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2006; 23(10):1463-72AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The exclusion of oats from the diet in coeliac disease is controversial.

AIM

To study the long-term safety of oats in the treatment of children with coeliac disease.

METHODS

Altogether 32 children with coeliac disease were enrolled in a 2-year controlled trial. Twenty-three children in remission were randomized either to oats or gluten challenge; when small bowel histological relapse was evident after gluten challenge, a gluten-free diet including oats was started. Furthermore, nine newly detected coeliac patients adopted an oat-containing gluten-free diet. Small bowel mucosal morphology, CD3+, alphabeta+ and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR expression and coeliac serology were determined. After the trial, the children were allowed to eat oats freely; follow-up was extended up to 7 years.

RESULTS

In coeliac children in remission, oats had no detrimental effect on intestinal histology or serology during the 2-year trial. In contrast, the gluten-challenge group relapsed after 3-12 months. Complete recovery from the disease was accomplished in all relapsed and newly detected patients on an oat-containing gluten-free diet. After the trial, 86% of the children preferred to consume oats and they all remained in remission.

CONCLUSION

In most children with coeliac disease, long-term consumption of oats is well tolerated, and it does not result in small bowel mucosal deterioration or immune activation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16669961

Citation

Holm, K, et al. "Oats in the Treatment of Childhood Coeliac Disease: a 2-year Controlled Trial and a Long-term Clinical Follow-up Study." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 23, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1463-72.
Holm K, Mäki M, Vuolteenaho N, et al. Oats in the treatment of childhood coeliac disease: a 2-year controlled trial and a long-term clinical follow-up study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;23(10):1463-72.
Holm, K., Mäki, M., Vuolteenaho, N., Mustalahti, K., Ashorn, M., Ruuska, T., & Kaukinen, K. (2006). Oats in the treatment of childhood coeliac disease: a 2-year controlled trial and a long-term clinical follow-up study. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 23(10), pp. 1463-72.
Holm K, et al. Oats in the Treatment of Childhood Coeliac Disease: a 2-year Controlled Trial and a Long-term Clinical Follow-up Study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 May 15;23(10):1463-72. PubMed PMID: 16669961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oats in the treatment of childhood coeliac disease: a 2-year controlled trial and a long-term clinical follow-up study. AU - Holm,K, AU - Mäki,M, AU - Vuolteenaho,N, AU - Mustalahti,K, AU - Ashorn,M, AU - Ruuska,T, AU - Kaukinen,K, PY - 2006/5/4/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/5/4/entrez SP - 1463 EP - 72 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 23 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: The exclusion of oats from the diet in coeliac disease is controversial. AIM: To study the long-term safety of oats in the treatment of children with coeliac disease. METHODS: Altogether 32 children with coeliac disease were enrolled in a 2-year controlled trial. Twenty-three children in remission were randomized either to oats or gluten challenge; when small bowel histological relapse was evident after gluten challenge, a gluten-free diet including oats was started. Furthermore, nine newly detected coeliac patients adopted an oat-containing gluten-free diet. Small bowel mucosal morphology, CD3+, alphabeta+ and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR expression and coeliac serology were determined. After the trial, the children were allowed to eat oats freely; follow-up was extended up to 7 years. RESULTS: In coeliac children in remission, oats had no detrimental effect on intestinal histology or serology during the 2-year trial. In contrast, the gluten-challenge group relapsed after 3-12 months. Complete recovery from the disease was accomplished in all relapsed and newly detected patients on an oat-containing gluten-free diet. After the trial, 86% of the children preferred to consume oats and they all remained in remission. CONCLUSION: In most children with coeliac disease, long-term consumption of oats is well tolerated, and it does not result in small bowel mucosal deterioration or immune activation. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16669961/Oats_in_the_treatment_of_childhood_coeliac_disease:_a_2_year_controlled_trial_and_a_long_term_clinical_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.02908.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -