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Living donation decision making: recipients' concerns and educational needs.
Prog Transplant. 2006 Mar; 16(1):17-23.PT

Abstract

CONTEXT

Despite the advantages of living donor transplantation, evidence suggests that some potential recipients with living donors have psychological concerns that prevent them from pursuing living donation. Addressing these concerns through education may increase the rates of living donation.

OBJECTIVE

To understand the psychological barriers and educational needs of potential kidney recipients regarding living donation.

SUBJECTS AND DESIGN

Qualitative focus group study of kidney transplant recipients, donors, and family members to explore their assessment of the advantages of dialysis and deceased donor transplantation over living donation, their concerns about living donation, and what types of living donation education would be most helpful.

RESULTS

Kidney recipients reported that they might not pursue living donation because they felt guilty and indebted to the donor, did not want to harm or inconvenience the donor, did not want to accept a kidney that a family member might need later, and did not want to disappoint the donor if the kidney failed. Recipients were generally unaware that donors could personally benefit from donating and would rather wait for donor volunteers than ask anyone directly. Both donors and recipients thought that training on how to make the donation request and education about living donors' motivations for donation and transplant experience could help more renal patients pursue living donation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16676669

Citation

Waterman, Amy D., et al. "Living Donation Decision Making: Recipients' Concerns and Educational Needs." Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), vol. 16, no. 1, 2006, pp. 17-23.
Waterman AD, Stanley SL, Covelli T, et al. Living donation decision making: recipients' concerns and educational needs. Prog Transplant. 2006;16(1):17-23.
Waterman, A. D., Stanley, S. L., Covelli, T., Hazel, E., Hong, B. A., & Brennan, D. C. (2006). Living donation decision making: recipients' concerns and educational needs. Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 16(1), 17-23.
Waterman AD, et al. Living Donation Decision Making: Recipients' Concerns and Educational Needs. Prog Transplant. 2006;16(1):17-23. PubMed PMID: 16676669.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Living donation decision making: recipients' concerns and educational needs. AU - Waterman,Amy D, AU - Stanley,Sara L, AU - Covelli,Tonie, AU - Hazel,Erik, AU - Hong,Barry A, AU - Brennan,Daniel C, PY - 2006/5/9/pubmed PY - 2006/6/6/medline PY - 2006/5/9/entrez SP - 17 EP - 23 JF - Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) JO - Prog Transplant VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - CONTEXT: Despite the advantages of living donor transplantation, evidence suggests that some potential recipients with living donors have psychological concerns that prevent them from pursuing living donation. Addressing these concerns through education may increase the rates of living donation. OBJECTIVE: To understand the psychological barriers and educational needs of potential kidney recipients regarding living donation. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: Qualitative focus group study of kidney transplant recipients, donors, and family members to explore their assessment of the advantages of dialysis and deceased donor transplantation over living donation, their concerns about living donation, and what types of living donation education would be most helpful. RESULTS: Kidney recipients reported that they might not pursue living donation because they felt guilty and indebted to the donor, did not want to harm or inconvenience the donor, did not want to accept a kidney that a family member might need later, and did not want to disappoint the donor if the kidney failed. Recipients were generally unaware that donors could personally benefit from donating and would rather wait for donor volunteers than ask anyone directly. Both donors and recipients thought that training on how to make the donation request and education about living donors' motivations for donation and transplant experience could help more renal patients pursue living donation. SN - 1526-9248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16676669/Living_donation_decision_making:_recipients'_concerns_and_educational_needs_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=16676669 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -