Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Morbidity and mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children with neurological disability.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Apr; 21(4):734-8.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Gastrostomy placement has become an integral mechanism for delivering nutritional support to children with severe neurological disability. Its impact on gastroesophageal reflux and mortality remains contentious. We examined the morbidity and long-term mortality of a group of children with severe neurological disability after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG).

METHODS

We retrospectively identified all children with severe neurological disability who had a PEG at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne between 1990 and 1997. Data were obtained from medical records.

RESULTS

Ninety-eight children with neurological disability (M:F 1.8:1.0; median age 3.5 years, interquartile range 1.1-8.7 years) had an initial PEG in this period and were able to be followed for 6-14 years. As a group, they were underweight for their age with a Z score at PEG of -3.52 (SD 3.33), but had increased weight-for-age Z scores by 1.05 after a mean period of 6.1 months. Fourteen subsequently required fundoplication for reflux. Mortality rates were 11% after 1 year, 21% after 2 years, 27% after 3 years and 39% after 13 years. Mortality was increased in those children who were older at the time of PEG (P = 0.06). Gastroesophageal reflux, underweight-for-age and gender were not significantly related to mortality.

CONCLUSION

Children with severe neurological dysfunction who require gastrostomy feeding have a substantial long-term mortality, but this may be unrelated to PEG placement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. tony.cattosmith@rch.org.auNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16677161

Citation

Catto-Smith, Anthony G., and Susan Jimenez. "Morbidity and Mortality After Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Children With Neurological Disability." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 21, no. 4, 2006, pp. 734-8.
Catto-Smith AG, Jimenez S. Morbidity and mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children with neurological disability. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(4):734-8.
Catto-Smith, A. G., & Jimenez, S. (2006). Morbidity and mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children with neurological disability. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 21(4), 734-8.
Catto-Smith AG, Jimenez S. Morbidity and Mortality After Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Children With Neurological Disability. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(4):734-8. PubMed PMID: 16677161.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Morbidity and mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children with neurological disability. AU - Catto-Smith,Anthony G, AU - Jimenez,Susan, PY - 2006/5/9/pubmed PY - 2006/10/13/medline PY - 2006/5/9/entrez SP - 734 EP - 8 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastrostomy placement has become an integral mechanism for delivering nutritional support to children with severe neurological disability. Its impact on gastroesophageal reflux and mortality remains contentious. We examined the morbidity and long-term mortality of a group of children with severe neurological disability after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). METHODS: We retrospectively identified all children with severe neurological disability who had a PEG at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne between 1990 and 1997. Data were obtained from medical records. RESULTS: Ninety-eight children with neurological disability (M:F 1.8:1.0; median age 3.5 years, interquartile range 1.1-8.7 years) had an initial PEG in this period and were able to be followed for 6-14 years. As a group, they were underweight for their age with a Z score at PEG of -3.52 (SD 3.33), but had increased weight-for-age Z scores by 1.05 after a mean period of 6.1 months. Fourteen subsequently required fundoplication for reflux. Mortality rates were 11% after 1 year, 21% after 2 years, 27% after 3 years and 39% after 13 years. Mortality was increased in those children who were older at the time of PEG (P = 0.06). Gastroesophageal reflux, underweight-for-age and gender were not significantly related to mortality. CONCLUSION: Children with severe neurological dysfunction who require gastrostomy feeding have a substantial long-term mortality, but this may be unrelated to PEG placement. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16677161/Morbidity_and_mortality_after_percutaneous_endoscopic_gastrostomy_in_children_with_neurological_disability_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -