Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Double dissociation between hippocampal and prefrontal lesions on an operant delayed matching task and a water maze reference memory task.
Behav Brain Res. 2006 Jul 15; 171(1):116-26.BB

Abstract

The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex have both been implicated in various aspects of the acquisition, retention and performance of delayed matching to position (DMTP) tasks in the rat, although their precise respective contributions remain unclear. In the present study, rats were trained preoperatively on DMTP before receiving excitotoxic bilateral lesions of either the entire hippocampus or the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats with lesions of the prefrontal cortex exhibited a significant delay-dependent impairment on retention of the DMTP task, whereas hippocampal lesions were without effect. Rats were also exposed to a switch in the contingencies to a 'non-matching' rule, as an analogue of switching between decision rules in the human Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, in which human patients with prefrontal damage are impaired. Both lesion groups acquired the new contingency at control levels, providing no evidence towards a role for either of these areas in this type of rule-switching. The same rats were also assessed in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze, which revealed an impairment in escape latencies and path length that was specific to the hippocampal lesions. The results corroborate previous evidence that the hippocampus is not necessary for at least some aspects of working memory performance in the DMTP task, whereas the delay-dependent deficit in the prefrontal lesion group support this task as a potentially powerful tool for assessing the cognitive changes associated with frontal damage and repair.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brain Repair Group, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Wales, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16677723

Citation

Sloan, Hazel L., et al. "Double Dissociation Between Hippocampal and Prefrontal Lesions On an Operant Delayed Matching Task and a Water Maze Reference Memory Task." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 171, no. 1, 2006, pp. 116-26.
Sloan HL, Good M, Dunnett SB. Double dissociation between hippocampal and prefrontal lesions on an operant delayed matching task and a water maze reference memory task. Behav Brain Res. 2006;171(1):116-26.
Sloan, H. L., Good, M., & Dunnett, S. B. (2006). Double dissociation between hippocampal and prefrontal lesions on an operant delayed matching task and a water maze reference memory task. Behavioural Brain Research, 171(1), 116-26.
Sloan HL, Good M, Dunnett SB. Double Dissociation Between Hippocampal and Prefrontal Lesions On an Operant Delayed Matching Task and a Water Maze Reference Memory Task. Behav Brain Res. 2006 Jul 15;171(1):116-26. PubMed PMID: 16677723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Double dissociation between hippocampal and prefrontal lesions on an operant delayed matching task and a water maze reference memory task. AU - Sloan,Hazel L, AU - Good,Mark, AU - Dunnett,Stephen B, Y1 - 2006/05/04/ PY - 2005/12/07/received PY - 2006/03/13/revised PY - 2006/03/22/accepted PY - 2006/5/9/pubmed PY - 2006/8/4/medline PY - 2006/5/9/entrez SP - 116 EP - 26 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav Brain Res VL - 171 IS - 1 N2 - The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex have both been implicated in various aspects of the acquisition, retention and performance of delayed matching to position (DMTP) tasks in the rat, although their precise respective contributions remain unclear. In the present study, rats were trained preoperatively on DMTP before receiving excitotoxic bilateral lesions of either the entire hippocampus or the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats with lesions of the prefrontal cortex exhibited a significant delay-dependent impairment on retention of the DMTP task, whereas hippocampal lesions were without effect. Rats were also exposed to a switch in the contingencies to a 'non-matching' rule, as an analogue of switching between decision rules in the human Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, in which human patients with prefrontal damage are impaired. Both lesion groups acquired the new contingency at control levels, providing no evidence towards a role for either of these areas in this type of rule-switching. The same rats were also assessed in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze, which revealed an impairment in escape latencies and path length that was specific to the hippocampal lesions. The results corroborate previous evidence that the hippocampus is not necessary for at least some aspects of working memory performance in the DMTP task, whereas the delay-dependent deficit in the prefrontal lesion group support this task as a potentially powerful tool for assessing the cognitive changes associated with frontal damage and repair. SN - 0166-4328 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16677723/Double_dissociation_between_hippocampal_and_prefrontal_lesions_on_an_operant_delayed_matching_task_and_a_water_maze_reference_memory_task_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(06)00184-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -