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Low lumbar spine bone mineral density in both male and female endurance runners.
Bone. 2006 Oct; 39(4):880-5.BONE

Abstract

There have been many reports of low bone mineral density (BMD) in female endurance runners. Although there have been several reports of low BMD in male runners, it is unclear how comparable the problem is to that in females. We compared BMD between male and female endurance runners and with a reference population. One hundred and nine endurance runners (65 females, 44 males) aged 19-50 years participated and had been training regularly for at least 3 years (32-187.2 km week(-1)) in events from 3 km to the marathon. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-L4) and hip by DXA. A questionnaire assessed training and menstrual status. Lumbar spine T scores were similar in male and female runners (-0.8 (0.8) versus -0.8 (0.7); f = 0.015; P = 0.904) as were total hip T scores (0.6 (7.9) versus 0.5 (9.2); f = 0.192; P = 0.662). The proportion of male runners with low lumbar spine BMD (<-1.0) (n = 16 from 44) compared to that of females (n = 27 from 65) (P = 0.675). Males had lower spine T scores than eumenorrhoeic females (-0.8 (0.7) versus -0.4 (0.7); f = 5.169; P = 0.03). There were moderate negative correlations between weekly running distance and lumbar spine BMD in males and females (r(2) = 0.267; 0.189; P < 0.001), independent of menstrual status in females (r(2) = 0.192; P < 0.001). Lumbar spine but not hip T scores were greater in runners who participated in resistance training at least twice-a-week (male: -0.4 versus -1.1; female: -0.5 versus -1.1; P < 0.01). Using multiple regression, running distance (-) and BMI (+) together best predicted lumbar spine T scores (r(2) = 0.402; P < 0.01) in females. Although weak, BMI (+) best predicted hip T scores (r(2) = 0.167; P < 0.05). In males, running distance and training years (-) together best predicted lumbar spine T scores (r(2) = 0.400; P < 0.01). Training years (-) best predicted hip T scores (r(2) = 0.361; P < 0.01). To conclude, our findings suggest that male runners face the same bone threat at the spine, as female runners. Further research in male athletes is required. Incorporation of regular resistance training into an athlete's training programme may be a useful preventative strategy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Bone and Body Composition Research, Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Ground Floor, Wellcome Wing, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, LS1 3EX, UK. kh@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk <kh@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16682267

Citation

Hind, K, et al. "Low Lumbar Spine Bone Mineral Density in Both Male and Female Endurance Runners." Bone, vol. 39, no. 4, 2006, pp. 880-5.
Hind K, Truscott JG, Evans JA. Low lumbar spine bone mineral density in both male and female endurance runners. Bone. 2006;39(4):880-5.
Hind, K., Truscott, J. G., & Evans, J. A. (2006). Low lumbar spine bone mineral density in both male and female endurance runners. Bone, 39(4), 880-5.
Hind K, Truscott JG, Evans JA. Low Lumbar Spine Bone Mineral Density in Both Male and Female Endurance Runners. Bone. 2006;39(4):880-5. PubMed PMID: 16682267.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low lumbar spine bone mineral density in both male and female endurance runners. AU - Hind,K, AU - Truscott,J G, AU - Evans,J A, Y1 - 2006/05/06/ PY - 2005/10/19/received PY - 2006/03/22/revised PY - 2006/03/28/accepted PY - 2006/5/10/pubmed PY - 2006/12/13/medline PY - 2006/5/10/entrez SP - 880 EP - 5 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 39 IS - 4 N2 - There have been many reports of low bone mineral density (BMD) in female endurance runners. Although there have been several reports of low BMD in male runners, it is unclear how comparable the problem is to that in females. We compared BMD between male and female endurance runners and with a reference population. One hundred and nine endurance runners (65 females, 44 males) aged 19-50 years participated and had been training regularly for at least 3 years (32-187.2 km week(-1)) in events from 3 km to the marathon. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-L4) and hip by DXA. A questionnaire assessed training and menstrual status. Lumbar spine T scores were similar in male and female runners (-0.8 (0.8) versus -0.8 (0.7); f = 0.015; P = 0.904) as were total hip T scores (0.6 (7.9) versus 0.5 (9.2); f = 0.192; P = 0.662). The proportion of male runners with low lumbar spine BMD (<-1.0) (n = 16 from 44) compared to that of females (n = 27 from 65) (P = 0.675). Males had lower spine T scores than eumenorrhoeic females (-0.8 (0.7) versus -0.4 (0.7); f = 5.169; P = 0.03). There were moderate negative correlations between weekly running distance and lumbar spine BMD in males and females (r(2) = 0.267; 0.189; P < 0.001), independent of menstrual status in females (r(2) = 0.192; P < 0.001). Lumbar spine but not hip T scores were greater in runners who participated in resistance training at least twice-a-week (male: -0.4 versus -1.1; female: -0.5 versus -1.1; P < 0.01). Using multiple regression, running distance (-) and BMI (+) together best predicted lumbar spine T scores (r(2) = 0.402; P < 0.01) in females. Although weak, BMI (+) best predicted hip T scores (r(2) = 0.167; P < 0.05). In males, running distance and training years (-) together best predicted lumbar spine T scores (r(2) = 0.400; P < 0.01). Training years (-) best predicted hip T scores (r(2) = 0.361; P < 0.01). To conclude, our findings suggest that male runners face the same bone threat at the spine, as female runners. Further research in male athletes is required. Incorporation of regular resistance training into an athlete's training programme may be a useful preventative strategy. SN - 8756-3282 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16682267/Low_lumbar_spine_bone_mineral_density_in_both_male_and_female_endurance_runners_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756-3282(06)00402-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -