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Acting intentionally and the side-effect effect.
Psychol Sci. 2006 May; 17(5):421-7.PS

Abstract

The concept of acting intentionally is an important nexus where theory of mind and moral judgment meet. Preschool children's judgments of intentional action show a valence-driven asymmetry. Children say that a foreseen but disavowed side effect is brought about "on purpose" when the side effect itself is morally bad, but not when it is morally good. This is the first demonstration in preschoolers that moral judgment influences judgments of whether something was done on purpose (as opposed to judgments of purpose influencing moral judgment). Judgments of intentionality are usually assumed to be purely factual. That these judgments are sometimes partly normative-even in preschoolers-challenges current understanding. Young children's judgments regarding foreseen side effects depend on whether the children process the idea that the character does not care about the side effect. As soon as preschoolers effectively process the theory-of-mind concept "not care that P," children show the side-effect effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. aleslie@ruccs.rutgers.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16683930

Citation

Leslie, Alan M., et al. "Acting Intentionally and the Side-effect Effect." Psychological Science, vol. 17, no. 5, 2006, pp. 421-7.
Leslie AM, Knobe J, Cohen A. Acting intentionally and the side-effect effect. Psychol Sci. 2006;17(5):421-7.
Leslie, A. M., Knobe, J., & Cohen, A. (2006). Acting intentionally and the side-effect effect. Psychological Science, 17(5), 421-7.
Leslie AM, Knobe J, Cohen A. Acting Intentionally and the Side-effect Effect. Psychol Sci. 2006;17(5):421-7. PubMed PMID: 16683930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acting intentionally and the side-effect effect. AU - Leslie,Alan M, AU - Knobe,Joshua, AU - Cohen,Adam, PY - 2006/5/11/pubmed PY - 2006/6/29/medline PY - 2006/5/11/entrez SP - 421 EP - 7 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - The concept of acting intentionally is an important nexus where theory of mind and moral judgment meet. Preschool children's judgments of intentional action show a valence-driven asymmetry. Children say that a foreseen but disavowed side effect is brought about "on purpose" when the side effect itself is morally bad, but not when it is morally good. This is the first demonstration in preschoolers that moral judgment influences judgments of whether something was done on purpose (as opposed to judgments of purpose influencing moral judgment). Judgments of intentionality are usually assumed to be purely factual. That these judgments are sometimes partly normative-even in preschoolers-challenges current understanding. Young children's judgments regarding foreseen side effects depend on whether the children process the idea that the character does not care about the side effect. As soon as preschoolers effectively process the theory-of-mind concept "not care that P," children show the side-effect effect. SN - 0956-7976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16683930/Acting_intentionally_and_the_side_effect_effect_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01722.x?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -