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Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets.
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006 Jun; 90(5-6):185-91.JA

Abstract

A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41% energy, average daily intake: 8018 +/- 1247 kJ/day, mean +/- SD) and low-fat (LF, 14% energy, average daily intake: 7331 +/- 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean +/- SD REE was not different between diets (4940 +/- 361 vs. 4861 +/- 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 +/- 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 +/- 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, 95616, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16684138

Citation

Yoo, S, et al. "Resting Energy Expenditure and Body Composition of Labrador Retrievers Fed High Fat and Low Fat Diets." Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 5-6, 2006, pp. 185-91.
Yoo S, Ramsey JJ, Havel PJ, et al. Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006;90(5-6):185-91.
Yoo, S., Ramsey, J. J., Havel, P. J., Jones, P. G., & Fascetti, A. J. (2006). Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 90(5-6), 185-91.
Yoo S, et al. Resting Energy Expenditure and Body Composition of Labrador Retrievers Fed High Fat and Low Fat Diets. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006;90(5-6):185-91. PubMed PMID: 16684138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets. AU - Yoo,S, AU - Ramsey,J J, AU - Havel,P J, AU - Jones,P G, AU - Fascetti,A J, PY - 2006/5/11/pubmed PY - 2006/8/1/medline PY - 2006/5/11/entrez SP - 185 EP - 91 JF - Journal of animal physiology and animal nutrition JO - J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl) VL - 90 IS - 5-6 N2 - A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41% energy, average daily intake: 8018 +/- 1247 kJ/day, mean +/- SD) and low-fat (LF, 14% energy, average daily intake: 7331 +/- 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean +/- SD REE was not different between diets (4940 +/- 361 vs. 4861 +/- 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 +/- 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 +/- 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet. SN - 0931-2439 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16684138/Resting_energy_expenditure_and_body_composition_of_Labrador_Retrievers_fed_high_fat_and_low_fat_diets_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2005.00588.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -