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Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats.
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl) 2006; 90(5-6):216-22JA

Abstract

The objective of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) from sulphate and glycinate as representatives of inorganic and organic zinc sources. The semi-synthetic basal diet contained 2 microg/g of native Zn and was fortified with pure sodium-phytate (8 g/kg) in order to simulate conditions of common cereal-based meals. The basal diet was supplemented with either 53 microg/g of Zn from sulphate (control) or 10 microg/g of Zn from either sulphate (ZnSulphate) or glycinate (ZnGly). Twenty-four (65)Zn-labelled, growing rats weighing 133 g were allotted to the three diets (eight animals per treatment) and were kept pair-fed to ZnSulphate for 15 days. Zn contents in blood plasma, femur and whole body, as well as, plasma alkaline phosphatase activities were reduced compared with control indicating a zinc deficiency in ZnSulphate and ZnGly treatment. This allowed their differentiation in zinc bioavailability. True absorption of dietary Zn was significantly higher in ZnGly than in ZnSulphate (51% vs. 44%) while losses of endogenous faecal Zn and urinary Zn were not affected to a quantitatively relevant extent (mean: 17% and 2% of intake). This resulted in a +30% significantly improved Zn retention for ZnGly (33% vs. 25%) and a lower severity on Zn deficiency symptoms compared with ZnSulphate. Metabolic utilization accounted for 95% of absorbed dietary Zn for both Zn sources. Overall, the bioavailability of zinc glycinate was significantly superior by 16% to zinc sulphate (49% vs. 42%), mainly because of a higher absorptive potential at presence of a strong anti-nutritive component (phytate) in the diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pancosma SA, Le Grand-Saconnex/GE, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16684142

Citation

Schlegel, P, and W Windisch. "Bioavailability of Zinc Glycinate in Comparison With Zinc Sulphate in the Presence of Dietary Phytate in an Animal Model With Zn Labelled Rats." Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 5-6, 2006, pp. 216-22.
Schlegel P, Windisch W. Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006;90(5-6):216-22.
Schlegel, P., & Windisch, W. (2006). Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 90(5-6), pp. 216-22.
Schlegel P, Windisch W. Bioavailability of Zinc Glycinate in Comparison With Zinc Sulphate in the Presence of Dietary Phytate in an Animal Model With Zn Labelled Rats. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006;90(5-6):216-22. PubMed PMID: 16684142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats. AU - Schlegel,P, AU - Windisch,W, PY - 2006/5/11/pubmed PY - 2006/8/1/medline PY - 2006/5/11/entrez SP - 216 EP - 22 JF - Journal of animal physiology and animal nutrition JO - J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl) VL - 90 IS - 5-6 N2 - The objective of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) from sulphate and glycinate as representatives of inorganic and organic zinc sources. The semi-synthetic basal diet contained 2 microg/g of native Zn and was fortified with pure sodium-phytate (8 g/kg) in order to simulate conditions of common cereal-based meals. The basal diet was supplemented with either 53 microg/g of Zn from sulphate (control) or 10 microg/g of Zn from either sulphate (ZnSulphate) or glycinate (ZnGly). Twenty-four (65)Zn-labelled, growing rats weighing 133 g were allotted to the three diets (eight animals per treatment) and were kept pair-fed to ZnSulphate for 15 days. Zn contents in blood plasma, femur and whole body, as well as, plasma alkaline phosphatase activities were reduced compared with control indicating a zinc deficiency in ZnSulphate and ZnGly treatment. This allowed their differentiation in zinc bioavailability. True absorption of dietary Zn was significantly higher in ZnGly than in ZnSulphate (51% vs. 44%) while losses of endogenous faecal Zn and urinary Zn were not affected to a quantitatively relevant extent (mean: 17% and 2% of intake). This resulted in a +30% significantly improved Zn retention for ZnGly (33% vs. 25%) and a lower severity on Zn deficiency symptoms compared with ZnSulphate. Metabolic utilization accounted for 95% of absorbed dietary Zn for both Zn sources. Overall, the bioavailability of zinc glycinate was significantly superior by 16% to zinc sulphate (49% vs. 42%), mainly because of a higher absorptive potential at presence of a strong anti-nutritive component (phytate) in the diet. SN - 0931-2439 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16684142/Bioavailability_of_zinc_glycinate_in_comparison_with_zinc_sulphate_in_the_presence_of_dietary_phytate_in_an_animal_model_with_Zn_labelled_rats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2005.00583.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -