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Psychosocial outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with acute coronary syndromes: a prospective repeated measures study.
Int J Nurs Stud. 2007 Aug; 44(6):945-52.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Western studies have suggested that emotional stress and distress impacted on the morbidity and mortality in people following acute coronary events. Symptoms of anxiety and depression have been associated with re-infarction and death, prolonged recovery and disability and depression may precipitate the client's low self-esteem. This study examined perceived anxiety, depression and self-esteem of Hong Kong Chinese clients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) over a 6-month period following hospital admission.

OBJECTIVES

To examine:

DESIGN

A prospective, repeated measures design with measures taken on two occasions over a 6-month period; (1) within the 1st week of hospital admission following the onset of ACS and (2) at 6 months follow up.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

Convenient sample of 182 voluntary consented clients admitted with ACS to a major public hospital in Hong Kong who could communicate in Chinese, complete questionnaires, cognitive intact, and were haemodynamically stable and free from acute chest pain at the time of interview.

METHODS

Baseline data were obtained within 1 week after hospital admission. The follow-up data was collected 6 months after hospital discharge. The Chinese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), State Self-esteem Scale (SSES), and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) were used to assess anxiety and depression, state self-esteem, and trait self-esteem, respectively.

RESULTS

Findings suggested gender differences in clients' perception in anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Improvements in clients' perception of these variables were evident over the 6-month period following their acute coronary events.

CONCLUSION

The study confirmed the western notion that psychosocial problems are common among coronary clients and this also applies to Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with ACS. Further studies to explore effective interventions to address these psychosocial issues are recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Australian Catholic University Melbourne, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia. d.chan@patrick.acu.edu.au <d.chan@patrick.acu.edu.au>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16697383

Citation

Chan, Dominic S K., et al. "Psychosocial Outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese Diagnosed With Acute Coronary Syndromes: a Prospective Repeated Measures Study." International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 44, no. 6, 2007, pp. 945-52.
Chan DS, Chau JP, Chang AM. Psychosocial outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with acute coronary syndromes: a prospective repeated measures study. Int J Nurs Stud. 2007;44(6):945-52.
Chan, D. S., Chau, J. P., & Chang, A. M. (2007). Psychosocial outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with acute coronary syndromes: a prospective repeated measures study. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44(6), 945-52.
Chan DS, Chau JP, Chang AM. Psychosocial Outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese Diagnosed With Acute Coronary Syndromes: a Prospective Repeated Measures Study. Int J Nurs Stud. 2007;44(6):945-52. PubMed PMID: 16697383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with acute coronary syndromes: a prospective repeated measures study. AU - Chan,Dominic S K, AU - Chau,Janita P C, AU - Chang,Anne M, Y1 - 2006/05/12/ PY - 2005/10/27/received PY - 2006/02/15/revised PY - 2006/03/25/accepted PY - 2006/5/16/pubmed PY - 2007/9/20/medline PY - 2006/5/16/entrez SP - 945 EP - 52 JF - International journal of nursing studies JO - Int J Nurs Stud VL - 44 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Western studies have suggested that emotional stress and distress impacted on the morbidity and mortality in people following acute coronary events. Symptoms of anxiety and depression have been associated with re-infarction and death, prolonged recovery and disability and depression may precipitate the client's low self-esteem. This study examined perceived anxiety, depression and self-esteem of Hong Kong Chinese clients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) over a 6-month period following hospital admission. OBJECTIVES: To examine: DESIGN: A prospective, repeated measures design with measures taken on two occasions over a 6-month period; (1) within the 1st week of hospital admission following the onset of ACS and (2) at 6 months follow up. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Convenient sample of 182 voluntary consented clients admitted with ACS to a major public hospital in Hong Kong who could communicate in Chinese, complete questionnaires, cognitive intact, and were haemodynamically stable and free from acute chest pain at the time of interview. METHODS: Baseline data were obtained within 1 week after hospital admission. The follow-up data was collected 6 months after hospital discharge. The Chinese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), State Self-esteem Scale (SSES), and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) were used to assess anxiety and depression, state self-esteem, and trait self-esteem, respectively. RESULTS: Findings suggested gender differences in clients' perception in anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Improvements in clients' perception of these variables were evident over the 6-month period following their acute coronary events. CONCLUSION: The study confirmed the western notion that psychosocial problems are common among coronary clients and this also applies to Hong Kong Chinese diagnosed with ACS. Further studies to explore effective interventions to address these psychosocial issues are recommended. SN - 0020-7489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16697383/Psychosocial_outcomes_of_Hong_Kong_Chinese_diagnosed_with_acute_coronary_syndromes:_a_prospective_repeated_measures_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0020-7489(06)00105-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -